Uh-Oh: Is Apple Already F*@%ing Up iTunes Radio?

It’s that difficult question that keeps resurfacing:

would this have happened if Steve were alive?

Back in the day, when Jobs unveiled something on stage, it was generally ready to go — at the Apple Store, on iTunes, whatever.  Which brings us to iTunes Radio, which is getting tons of media attention and is being showcased all over the Apple homepage, but is totally unavailable (for months).

Or… is it?  Here’s what happens when the uninitiated iTunes user (of which there are tens of millions) decides to update the application, and checks out ‘iTunes Radio’.

itunesradiowoops1

itunesradiowoops2

 

And if you don’t think this is an issue, consider this: there are currently more than 575 million iTunes registered users, and many of these users are new.  Back in September of 2009, there were ‘just’ 100 million.

32 Responses

  1. n' Stuff

    The problem with announcing something months in advance, which you’re right Steve Jobs would never do.

    Steve Jobs woudl never say:

    “check out the new iphone, it’s amazing! Go get it in October!”

    Reply
  2. Henry Chatfield

    iTunes has always had a ‘Radio’ feature…which is what that is a picture of I believe. I think the new iTunes Radio will look entirely different.

    Reply
  3. Kirk

    Wow, clueless. You’d never noticed iTunes has internet radio stations before? It’s only been, lets see, ten years or so….

    Reply
    • Paul Resnikoff

      I was probably using it the day it came out. But I run a publication about digital music; you’re in the digital music industry most likely.

      We’re not typical consumers; we’re not late adopters. We’re not the mass Apple is (usually) so great at courting…

      Reply
      • Delbert

        But still, you are reporting about digital music, of which iTunes is surely the biggest player. You can be forgiven for not knowing every nook and cranny of iTunes, but you must be pretty embarrassed to make such a grand statement as you did, and to be so horribly misinformed. I think I’d pull this article down if I was you to avoid further embarrassment and the blowing of your credibility.

        Reply
        • Paul Resnikoff

          Huh?

          I’m not only aware of the current radio feature, I used to use it as my internet radio of choice.

          But this isn’t about me. It’s also not about us, meaning informed industry insiders and execs.

          It’s about them: average consumers, mainstream people, some of whom aren’t even using Pandora.

          See the point now?

          Reply
          • Delbert

            No – I still don’t see the point. You reported that the new iTunes Radio feature was to be found if you downloaded the most recent version of iTunes, and that it was a fail. And that’s just wrong. As you said yourself, the feature has been there forever. So for those just noticing it it’s a failure? That’s ridiculous. How did Apple do something wrong here? They didn’t – they just have something they’ve always had. And it seems to me in your article that you didn’t understand that, or went out of your way to misconstrue something to make it look like Apple is “already “f*@%ing up” (in your headline), when I just don’t see that they did. You maybe did – but not them…

          • Paul Resnikoff

            Delbert,

            I see I need to try harder to articulate my point properly. The average, late-adopting consumer doesn’t know what WWDC is, they aren’t tuned into the nuances of ‘Radio on iTunes’ right now versus the ‘iTunes Radio’ of tomorrow. This is probably more pronounced outside of the US: 575 million registered users in 2013, 100 million in late-2009 (which means, tens of millions are still joining iTunes and registering for the first time ever, may from places other than the US).

            The 1,000 or so people you’re connected to are probably not in this group. But the world has billions of people you are not connecting with at all (or very little).

            Actually, maybe that’s not even true: I can think of a number of friends of mine (family, or otherwise) of the much older generation that might get confused by this. If I just told them ‘iTunes Radio’ in conversation, and they went home to check it out without any hand-holding. And part of the problem is that ‘iTunes Radio’ is splashed all over the apple.com front page. It’s all over the media, everyone is drooling over it.

            I might even have to explain the difference to a younger person (maybe), depending on whether they’ve connected into iTunes’ radio features. Of course, the explanation would be simpler to get across.

            So I really don’t need to sit here and try to convince you that I personally know the difference. Because I’m trying to convince you that they (ie, average consumer who isn’t entrenched in digital media to the same degree) may not know the difference.

            And that represents a marketing problem or issue for Apple, a company that prides itself on simplifying media software and hardware for consumers.

            Thanks for hearing me out.

          • Visitor

            wow. you just said the average late adopting consumer doesn’t know what WWDC is….so are you thinking these consumers are hearing this from ‘word of mouth’? unlikely considering everything else that Apple announced at WWDC… Even when you search Google News for iTunes Radio, the results are mostly from tech blogs or larger publications with ‘technology’ sections. I think Apple made it clear enough that this wasn’t coming out until fall and I would assume that anyone as tech-music savvy as THE Paul Resnikoff would communicate this should it come up in conversation. Not only are you riding the coat tails of false information, but you are highlighting a product that has been out for years rather than diving into a new product release. i’m disappointed that you havent at least paid the $99 for an iphone developer account so you could, at the very least, test iTunes Radio and report on its functions. Or maybe even speculate on how iTunes plans to pay content holders for this ‘revolutionary’ feature, which I’m sure industry folk are genuinely curious about. But I guess shock value and SEO wins in the end. Make an extreme statement with no merit and watch the page views pile up. I think the previous commentor just “Resnikoff’d” you.

  4. James

    I’m beta testing the new iOS 7 and the new iTunes Radio is on the update. It is entirely different than the current radio feature, and as others have pointed out, this has been an option for digital streams for years now. The new version has bugs, but that’s why it’s in beta testing and not ready for download by people who aren’t developers.

    Reply
  5. Visitor

    Oh dear. Probably best if you leave the iTunes talk to people who actually use iTunes.

    Reply
  6. David

    DMN is honestly the worst “publication” ever. These posts are ridiculous

    Reply
    • You'll be okay

      I can publish Cliff Notes for these articles if it will help you to understand them. This article has a very valid point which you seem to have missed if you’re not just trolling for the tech industry.

      Reply
      • Delbert

        No need to insult the poster because he has a valid point about your horribly misinformed article. Cliff Notes? The article hardly had any info at all, and it was all wrong info! What was the valid point again, because I missed it too. Was the point to write a scathing “comment” (not really an article) on something you know absolutely nothing about? Would make a great journalistic “how not to” example, but any other point is missed on me too. Also, I seem to recall that Steve Jobs announced at least the original iPhone months before it was available – including teaser ads on TV. So, your information is once again, pretty wrong…

        Reply
  7. -ologist

    Step our your bubbles people! Alot of people have NEVER even used internet radio much less Pandora.

    Reply
  8. Casey

    Stece Jobs would never have allowed the creation of a new radio service in the first place. This existing one is just a directory and cost Apple practically nothing to maintain, and has been around for countless years. This new servcie will be a low profit margin service at best and likely lose money for years.

    Reply
  9. MusicOfOurHeart

    I have to laugh because the press was positioning iTunes Radio as the “Spotify” killer. Once again rumors of Spotify’s death are greatly exaggerated by technology press reporters who fail to understand digital cloud music service architectures and purposes.

    Reply
  10. Hypebot Hater

    ok paul, at this point – you’ve gotta be just fucking with us, right? i mean, you can’t possibly be this inept.

    Reply
  11. hippydog

    WOW.. does anyone actually read the article all the way thru anymore?
    Quote Paul “Back in the day, when Jobs unveiled something on stage, it was generally ready to go”

    Quote “I think the new iTunes Radio will look entirely different.”

    Quote “You’d never noticed iTunes has internet radio stations before?”

    Quote “but you must be pretty embarrassed to make such a grand statement as you did,”

    Quote “I’m beta testing the new iOS 7 and the new iTunes Radio is on the update. It is entirely different than the current radio feature, and as others have pointed out, this has been an option for digital streams for years now.”

    Quote “Oh dear. Probably best if you leave the iTunes talk to people who actually use iTunes”

    Wow.. just wow..

    Did ANYONE who posted those statements even bother to read the next line?
    “Here’s what happens when the uninitiated iTunes user decides to update the application, and checks out ‘iTunes Radio'”

    and people wonder why Paul uses that RED ARROW so much 🙁

    Reply
    • Delbert

      Yes – I read it, and I still think it’s a very sloppy point at best. Should Apple have taken down the existing iTunes Radio feature so that the “uninitiated” wouldn’t be confused? How many people here would have complained about that. This all just smacks of Apple bashing. And believe me, I’m not a huge Apple “fanboy”. But this kinda hype really bugs me. Making something out of nothing to create controversy. I would be embarrased about making this tenuous argument. Basically, Apple announced something in the summer that’s coming in the fall – a very common practice even by Steve Jobs (so not sure where that’s coming from) and didn’t delete a feature they’ve had since the beginning of time. And that’s “f*@*%ing” up? Sounds to me like we’re looking a little too hard for a chance to make Apple look bad. They’re not incapable of doing that, for sure, but not here – seriously folks…

      Reply
      • hippydog

        Quote “Should Apple have taken down the existing iTunes Radio feature so that the “uninitiated” wouldn’t be confused? ”

        there are a bunch of things they could have done..

        Renamed one or picked a better name..

        Added a “coming soon button”

        Had a “beta test” that allowed anyone who wants too, to particepate (IE: not full functionality but a basic framework..)

        Etc etc etc..

        either way, when you get that much free advertisement, not doing ANTHING makes me think someone wasnt thinking very hard about it..

        As to the “Apple announced something in the summer that’s coming in the fall – a very common practice even by Steve Jobs”

        Those announcements always had some detail.. were expected. and were based on updates to things that already existed..

        http://mac.appstorm.net/general/opinion/thoughts-and-reflections-on-apples-product-release-cycle/

        Reply
  12. Terrible

    I always read this site b/c of the funny and untrue headlines, but this one takes the cake, Apple has had that Radio feature for years, this is a hilariously awfuly mistake

    Reply
    • dude

      iTunes has Radio, but it’s not “iTunes Radio.”

      See how that could confuse a newcomer?

      Reply
  13. gerbils

    Author: you really are an idiot. Take this article down, you’re embarrassing yourself.

    Reply
  14. Stepharoo

    I appreciated your article. It answered the question I had about itunes.

    Reply
  15. wodger

    I guess the logical conclusion is that Apple drop “the Other” Radio, from itunes, in favout of iRadio with track “buy” buttons or?

    Reply

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