Queens of the Stone Age, a Spotify Holdout, Scores a Number One Album…

This is now the third major artist to withhold a release from Spotify while giving preferential access to iTunes.  And, the third major artist in a row to score a number one album release.

See the pattern here?

qotsa

According to details tipped to Digital Music News by a major label executive, Queens of the Stone Age have now scored a number one album release with US-based sales of roughly 91,000 units.   The album, titled …Like Clockwork, was technically released in the US on Tuesday, June 4th, though the iTunes Store featured a prominent streaming exclusive one full week prior.

And of course, an equally prominent pre-order button.  Spotify told Digital Music News that this was just a ‘promotion’ before the ‘official release date,’ though another, equally valid description of reality might be an ‘iTunes streaming exclusive’.  Here’s what the iTunes page for Queens of the Stone Age looked like prior to Spotify getting any access.

queensitunes

Which reaffirms the presence of a new release strategy, based on its recent practice by both Daft Punk and Vampire Weekend.  Compared to these artists, the QOTSA approach is essentially cookie-cutter.  Here are the approximate dates of arrival for all three artists on both iTunes and Spotify.

 

itunesexclusivebreakdown4

74 Responses

  1. Me

    OH MY GOD! THEY WEREN’T HOLDING OUT ON SPOTIFY!!!!!!!!!!! This album was available on Spotify the same day it was available for download on iTunes, and the same day the CD was available in stores.

    Reply
    • Me

      By your logic, they were holding out at retailers because the album was streaming on iTunes before it the CD was available in stores.

      Reply
        • Champion

          Queens of the Stone Age were clearly trying to keep vinyl and physical record stores from cannibalizing their iTunes revenue. There’s no other possible explanation!

          Reply
          • zag

            The overall problem with this, is that Spotify while paying out for streams they probably don’t pay up front to get the content.

            iTunes will have the streaming because they will have paid the band or label or both a couple million to get the streamming so they get most of the “record” sales.

            Because if you go into a brick&motor record store ( iTunes thinks of itself like this) you buy the CD you either play the CD or if you want it on your mobile you’ll have to rip and copy the files over to your mobile or MP3 device etc. iTunes simply removes the need to rip a CD.

            Spotify while streaming isn’t the same deal as itunes, I’ve herad the daft punk CD via spotify and I really don’t know if I’d buy it now as it has a handful of decent tracks the rest is 80’s bedroom techno which is great if you like that but if your not then it’s not going to work as an album.

            Would I call these bands holdouts LOL LOL LOL. 1 week of streaming ONLY on itunes, I don’t even have itunes but I do pay for spotify and I wasn’t overly fussed about them having a 1 week head start on itunes I’ve streamed the daft punk on album a couple of times on spotify anyway.

            A band holdout on spotify is AC/DC they have nothing on spotify, they have around 35+ albums and not even 1 song is on spotify.

            You can get the hayseed dixies covers album of AC/DC but you can’t get the actual songs even though they just released all their albums on itunes 1-2 months ago.

            And that’s the 1st time they have released anything for sale digitally I think, AFAIK they don’t have anything on any streaming services.

            There’s plently of other bands like this as well, not just old ones you do have new ones as well.

            Overall though I think heaps of indie bands should get onto spotify and then go to gigs and then say they have CDs for sale or you can find us/them on spotify at least they’d be getting some money coming in via spotify sure it might not be much but it’s something.

    • Me

      So? That doesn’t automatically make them Spotify holdouts. At no point did they ever say “We are not going to make our music available on Spotify.” Vampire Weekend and The National held out of Spotify for a week, so you can call them holdouts. But, QotSA and Daft Punk DID NOT hold out.

      Reply
      • Visitor

        “So? That doesn’t automatically make them Spotify holdouts.”

        “Holdouts” may be the wrong word but whatever you call it iTunes is getting it first, they are clearly doing that.

        Reply
        • Me

          That’s my point. He’s calling them Spotify holdouts when they aren’t. It’s sensationalist journalism. I’m not arguing that iTunes got it first. They had it before everybody (not just Spotify).

          Reply
          • R.P.

            Identify yourself visitor because you are the man!!! .. or woman!

            no journalism here, just a lot of immaturity.. but it’s just like shit TV the Kardashians… once in a while you get entertained.

  2. Visitor

    “That doesn’t automatically make them Spotify holdouts”

    Um, yes…

    Reply
    • Me

      Um, no. Show me one article where QotSA or their label said they planned on holding out on Spotify.

      Reply
      • Visitor

        Don’t know what you mean, that’s exactly what they did…

        Seems to be a good idea, too.

        Reply
        • Me

          Can’t tell if you’re serious or just trolling. They didn’t HOLD OUT. The iTunes deal was an exclusive stream a week before the album was released ANYWHERE -not just Spotify (it wasn’t available for download on iTunes until the same day it was available on Spotify). The planned release date (by release date I am referring to the official sales start date as issued by the record label for the record to be available at legitimate retailers) was June 4th. You could not download on iTunes before then. You could not download it on Amazon before then. You could not buy it at a record store before then. And of course you could not stream it on any (legitimate) streaming sites before that date. Do you get what I mean now?

          Reply
          • Visitor

            “And of course you could not stream it on any (legitimate) streaming sites before that date”

            You could stream the songs on the world’s two biggest music sites — YouTube and iTunes.

            Not on Spotify, though. Which makes it a Spotify holdout.

            Not the first, and definitely not the last… 🙂

          • Me

            Please see the comment below w/ the definition of hold out. At no point was QotSA resisting Spotify. The album IS STREAMING ON SPOTIFY RIGHT NOW. Therefore, they are NOT HOLDING OUT.

  3. Correction

    Incorrect: QOTSA album was available on iTunes exclusive one full week ahead of Spotify.

    Reply
  4. Lynch

    So just because they streamed the album on Itunes for less than a week before the official release, that means it’s a Spotify holdout? Even though it was up on Spotify, Rdio, etc, the very same moment it was officially released on Itunes, retail stores, and elsewhere?

    Reply
    • Vail, CO

      “Release date” means nothing unless you’re Beyonce. When someone gets it that’s you’re “release date”

      Reply
      • Lynch

        Well then if thats the case, Itunes didn’t get the first release either! The album leaked in mid-May, so tens of thousands of people had already been listening to a free pirated copy by the time they streamed it on Itunes (a week before their “official” release).

        Reply
        • Me

          They were holding out on iTunes so the torrent sites could have an exclusive.

          Reply
  5. Adam

    Paul – when did the sales of those 91,000 units start? If it’s the same day as it was on Spotify then you’re just full of it again.

    Reply
    • Paul Resnikoff

      Pre-orders roll into the first week figures, pre-rls date. I’m looking at the stats shared with me, it confirms that.

      Reply
      • Adam

        So by your definition all iTunes pre-sales (which are essentially all releases) are held back from Spotify?

        Reply
  6. Bad Form

    C’mon Paul. An exclusive stream isn’t the same as a Spotify “hold-out”. As the gentleman stated above, that would be the same as saying they held out on FYE/Amazon/Rhapsody/every other music distributor/streaming service. Same thing as with Daft Punk…

    You should probably take this one down from your site. Bad form.

    sincerely,

    A fan of your work (usually).

    Reply
    • Paul Resnikoff

      I’d ask you to reconsider the premise of this logic, which may look good on a chalkboard but doesn’t translate as neatly into reality. The reason is that digital and physical have very differing rules and oftentimes differing audiences, demographics, and buying patterns.

      The focus of this piece is largely digital. Simply stated, digital access on one platform (ie, iTunes) and not another (ie, Spotify) means one is getting access and the other isn’t (ie, an exclusive).

      Thanks for considering my perspective on this.

      Reply
      • Me

        I get where you’re coming from on this (exclusive pre-streams on iTunes drives up download sales & gives iTunes a strong edge), but using the term “hold out” is blatantly misleading. Nowhere did QotSA (nor Daft Punk)indicate their album would not be available on Spotify. By calling them holdouts you are labeling them as something they are not.

        Also, why are you only calling them Spotify holdouts? By your logic, they are also Amazon holdouts, Rdio holdouts, Rhapsody holdouts, Muve holdouts, eMusic holdouts, etc. Why don’t you address that?

        Reply
        • Paul Resnikoff

          I think that’s a good criticism, it may be a poor choice of wording, I can see that perspective. Then again, Queens, Daft Punk, and Vampire all withheld for a week or more, while handing iTunes a very plum exclusive. So basically, I’m attempting to highlight that windowing and exclusive preference is happening here in the initial sales period. I am pointing out a developing trend.

          In terms of the selection of streaming service. ‘Spotify’ is the lead dog here, they are the first (or close to first) streaming platform that will be considered in release strategies. So, if Rhapsody suddenly gains 5 million subscribers tomorrow, I’ll talk about them more.

          Reply
          • Me

            But they weren’t withholding anything from Spotify (well, Vampire Weekend withheld for a week, but not DP or QotSA). Yes, this is a developing trend, but by singling out Spotify, and calling these bands Spotify holdouts you are not being objective and losing creativity. You seem to be wearing your personal vendetta against Spotify on your sleeve. There are better ways to go about proving your point than fudging the facts.

          • Paul Resnikoff

            I’m losing creativity? 😉

            On your ‘fudging’ accusation. Respectfully, I’ve laid out the facts above: dates of windowing, sales figures, official release dates, etc. The beauty of this forum is that everything written is routinely scrutinized, and corrected if incorrect (in the most humbling ways sometimes).

            Instead, this debate is largely about how to interpret the facts, or a reaction to my interpretation of the facts, not the veracity of the data presented.

          • Me

            Speaking of which… your dates are incorrect. Modern Vampires official release date was March 14. It was streaming on iTunes a week before that.

            Also your “data” is misleading. This isn’t about windowing. This is about iTunes getting a leg up on the competition.

          • Paul Resnikoff

            Actually, the headers in that grid don’t quite apply to Vampire Weekend, and yes, the streaming exclusive started even earlier. I’ll update that.

            The rest, as I’d mentioned, is interpretation. If you don’t think that’s windowing (with full iTunes release before Spotify), then that’s certainly an opinion (not sure how defensible, but an opinion and interpretation nonetheless).

          • Me

            But it’s not a FULL iTunes release. You couldn’t download it until the same day it was on Spotify.

            (*Btw, earlier when I said you were losing creativity, I mean to say credibility. That was a typo on my part. Sorry.)

  7. Champion

    This site is so ridiculous.

    Popular music is #1. It doesn’t have anything to do with Spotify.

    Reply
    • Lynch

      In this case I completely agree. They have sold more copies in the first week (on an indie label) than they previously had with Era Vulgaris (when they were with Interscope). Why? These guys understand what makes their fans tick. From the cryptic phone messages, to the errie video clips and artwork, and all the rest they have done over the past 4 months, they have single handedly created such a buzz over this album that people were sitting on the edge of their seats in ancticipation. They began putting out video’s for each song on Youtube weeks before Itunes got it’s “exclusive” streaming, all of those videos either surpassing or getting close to 1 million views within 48 hours of being posted. I can think of a few dozen friends who pre-ordered the record long before all of this as well (myself included). The whole “Itunes exclusive” plays a miniscule part in why this album is #1.

      Reply
  8. shutupalready

    The preorder and audio samples were live on iTunes for a month prior HOLY SHIT ITUNES HAD A MONTHLONG EXCLUSIVE SAMPLER, YOU GUYS.

    Reply
  9. Visitor

    “This is now the third major artist to withhold a release from Spotify while giving preferential access to iTunes”

    And the message is extremely powerful:

    Want new music? Go to iTunes!

    While Spotify slowly turns into a site where you listen to old stuff that doesn’t sell that much anymore.

    Reply
  10. GGG

    I think this argument is not really as straight forward as people want to make it, and I think the logic is a little flawed. I understand that having a stream with a pre-order button underneath will certainly grab some impulse buys, but you seem to be making the argument that streaming via a program that gives you money for plays (however nominal) is significantly worse than a program that doesn’t give you money for plays but makes it easier for someone to maybe buy your record. It’s just kinda weird. QotSA are a pretty popular band, especially overseas. It’s not too far-fetched to assume a lot of those 91K people would buy this album regardless. Especially since they’ve done that number in the past before Spotify even existed and this was their first album in almost 7 years.

    Reply
    • Me

      I agree. This is a veteran band (Their debut album was released 15 years ago), and have built up quite a following over the years. There are a lot of factors at play here – Previous successful albums; the return of Nick Oliveri (singing backup vocals on two tracks); Dave Grohl on drums (on 5 tracks); big name guests (Elton John, Trent Reznor, Mark Lanegan, Brody Dalle); their first record for Matador; and the fact that this has been the longest period in between releases for the band (6 years).

      Reply
  11. Anti Spotify FanBoy

    So DMN points out that iTunes gets the exclusive and this is the reaction? Spotify’s got the new fanboys.

    Reply
    • Me

      No, he’s not just “pointing this out.” He’s presenting it in a misleading manner. Instead of just stating that iTunes has exclusive streams before the album is available anywhere else, he’s wrongfully calling these bands Spotify holdouts, when they clearly are not.

      Reply
      • Visitor

        “calling these bands Spotify holdouts, when they clearly are not”

        Sure they are. Here’s a suggestion for Spotify’s new slogan:

        Spotify — Oldies but Goodies!

        Reply
        • Me

          And I’m guessing you’ve never used Spotify or any other streaming service. There’s a plethora of new albums on these services. In fact, the opposite of what you’re saying is true. The older bands are the ones that are more likely to hold out (Beatles, Led Zeppelin, etc.) than new artists.

          Reply
          • Visitor

            “And I’m guessing you’ve never used Spotify”

            Of course not, why would I? I like new music.

            And I can find everything I want on iTunes and YouTube.

          • Me

            With all due respect, if you haven’t used the service, you have no business criticizing it’s “content.” If you want to criticize it’s payouts, that’s fine. But to criticize a service’s product without ever using it is just being flat out ignorant.

          • Visitor

            Let’s try again:

            I want the latest music as soon as it’s available.

            You can’t use Spotify for that.

  12. Yves Villeneuve

    I think the idea here is to pre-empt Amazon, not Spotify.

    Giving Rhapsody an exclusive pre-release stream over Spotify would make sense since Rhapsody pays more on average. I would promote Rhapsody over Spotify’s meagre payouts, any day.

    Any way you look at it, doesn’t make sense to give Spotify a pre-release stream exclusive.

    Disclaimer: I’m a Spotify holdout.

    Reply
  13. Shoe Fits

    /ˈhōldˌout/
    Noun

    An act of resisting something or refusing to accept what is offered.

    Reply
  14. Stu

    It’s not streaming on iTunes any more, is it? They’ve PULLED IT FROM ITUNES in favour of Spotify? QOTSA DENY ITUNES STREAMING ALBUM headline on the way? 😉

    Reply
  15. Visitor

    See the pattern here? NO!!!

    Paul, do you really believe that a one week Spotify hold out is good for a #1 album? That’s scary…

    Reply
    • Me

      Thank you! This is everything I’ve been trying to say in these comments, only more eloquently put.

      Reply
  16. Hashbury

    Paul – linkbaiting aside, isn’t the real story here that iTunes has changed their strategy? I don’t recall these kind of exclusives before streaming (and specifically Spotify) began gaining traction. And even if I’m wrong and they did occasionally do a pre-release stream, this clearly is a new emphasis on setting up these deals for major releases.

    I’d argue that this is a significant crack in Steve Jobs’ original ownership philosophy. iTunes is acknowledging that consumers want streaming.

    Perhaps your next post should be about how iTunes is protecting their “old” ownership model by refusing to provide an on-demand streaming option to their consumers. That’s the lede here.

    Reply
    • Visitor

      “iTunes is acknowledging that consumers want streaming.”

      Consumers want free cars and eternal life, guess what they get.

      What Apple wants is to make iTunes the place you go for music.

      The interesting part is that they may succeed.

      Reply
  17. oldtimer

    Paul, you ever watched the movie Groundhog Day, featuring Bill Murray?

    Think you’d really dig it

    Reply
  18. old school industry dude

    91,000 ‘album’ sales=#1 album.

    that’s so sad.

    that’s all for now.

    Reply
    • Visitor

      True.

      Solve the mainstream piracy problem, or it’ll be 9,100 in 2023.

      Reply
        • GGG

          You know, by complaining. That seems to be the industry’s go-to method at the moment.

          Reply
          • Visitor

            “You know, by complaining”

            Yes, that does work!

            Everybody is listening now — even Google!

          • GGG

            Yes, and so timely, too! Napster only happened last millenium.

            Why find a real solution when you can bitch for over a decade?

          • HansH

            Comments Closed
            Comments (74)

            ME Thursday, June 13, 2013

            OH MY GOD! THEY WEREN’T HOLDING OUT ON SPOTIFY!!!!!!!!!!! This album was available on Spotify the same day it was available for download on iTunes, and the same day the CD was available in stores.

            ME Thursday, June 13, 2013

            By your logic, they were holding out at retailers because the album was streaming on iTunes before it the CD was available in stores.

            Haha Thursday, June 13, 2013

            Great point!

            Champion Thursday, June 13, 2013

            Queens of the Stone Age were clearly trying to keep vinyl and physical record stores from cannibalizing their iTunes revenue. There’s no other possible explanation!

            zag Saturday, June 15, 2013

            The overall problem with this, is that Spotify while paying out for streams they probably don’t pay up front to get the content.

            iTunes will have the streaming because they will have paid the band or label or both a couple million to get the streamming so they get most of the “record” sales.

            Because if you go into a brick&motor record store ( iTunes thinks of itself like this) you buy the CD you either play the CD or if you want it on your mobile you’ll have to rip and copy the files over to your mobile or MP3 device etc. iTunes simply removes the need to rip a CD.

            Spotify while streaming isn’t the same deal as itunes, I’ve herad the daft punk CD via spotify and I really don’t know if I’d buy it now as it has a handful of decent tracks the rest is 80’s bedroom techno which is great if you like that but if your not then it’s not going to work as an album.

            Would I call these bands holdouts LOL LOL LOL. 1 week of streaming ONLY on itunes, I don’t even have itunes but I do pay for spotify and I wasn’t overly fussed about them having a 1 week head start on itunes I’ve streamed the daft punk on album a couple of times on spotify anyway.

            A band holdout on spotify is AC/DC they have nothing on spotify, they have around 35+ albums and not even 1 song is on spotify.

            You can get the hayseed dixies covers album of AC/DC but you can’t get the actual songs even though they just released all their albums on itunes 1-2 months ago.

            And that’s the 1st time they have released anything for sale digitally I think, AFAIK they don’t have anything on any streaming services.

            There’s plently of other bands like this as well, not just old ones you do have new ones as well.

            Overall though I think heaps of indie bands should get onto spotify and then go to gigs and then say they have CDs for sale or you can find us/them on spotify at least they’d be getting some money coming in via spotify sure it might not be much but it’s something.

            Vail, CO Thursday, June 13, 2013

            It was on iTunes exclusively first.

            Me Thursday, June 13, 2013

            So? That doesn’t automatically make them Spotify holdouts. At no point did they ever say “We are not going to make our music available on Spotify.” Vampire Weekend and The National held out of Spotify for a week, so you can call them holdouts. But, QotSA and Daft Punk DID NOT hold out.

            Visitor Thursday, June 13, 2013

            “So? That doesn’t automatically make them Spotify holdouts.”

            “Holdouts” may be the wrong word but whatever you call it iTunes is getting it first, they are clearly doing that.

            Me Thursday, June 13, 2013

            That’s my point. He’s calling them Spotify holdouts when they aren’t. It’s sensationalist journalism. I’m not arguing that iTunes got it first. They had it before everybody (not just Spotify).

            Visitor Friday, June 14, 2013

            Journalism. It’s not even journalism….

            R.P. Friday, June 14, 2013

            Identify yourself visitor because you are the man!!! .. or woman!

            no journalism here, just a lot of immaturity.. but it’s just like shit TV the Kardashians… once in a while you get entertained.

            Visitor Thursday, June 13, 2013

            “That doesn’t automatically make them Spotify holdouts”

            Um, yes…

            Me Thursday, June 13, 2013

            Um, no. Show me one article where QotSA or their label said they planned on holding out on Spotify.

            Visitor Thursday, June 13, 2013

            Don’t know what you mean, that’s exactly what they did…

            Seems to be a good idea, too.

            ME Thursday, June 13, 2013

            Can’t tell if you’re serious or just trolling. They didn’t HOLD OUT. The iTunes deal was an exclusive stream a week before the album was released ANYWHERE -not just Spotify (it wasn’t available for download on iTunes until the same day it was available on Spotify). The planned release date (by release date I am referring to the official sales start date as issued by the record label for the record to be available at legitimate retailers) was June 4th. You could not download on iTunes before then. You could not download it on Amazon before then. You could not buy it at a record store before then. And of course you could not stream it on any (legitimate) streaming sites before that date. Do you get what I mean now?

            Visitor Friday, June 14, 2013

            “And of course you could not stream it on any (legitimate) streaming sites before that date”

            You could stream the songs on the world’s two biggest music sites — YouTube and iTunes.

            Not on Spotify, though. Which makes it a Spotify holdout.

            Not the first, and definitely not the last… 🙂

            Me Friday, June 14, 2013

            Please see the comment below w/ the definition of hold out. At no point was QotSA resisting Spotify. The album IS STREAMING ON SPOTIFY RIGHT NOW. Therefore, they are NOT HOLDING OUT.

            Correction Thursday, June 13, 2013

            Incorrect: QOTSA album was available on iTunes exclusive one full week ahead of Spotify.

            Me Thursday, June 13, 2013

            Not for download. Only to stream.

            Lynch Thursday, June 13, 2013

            So just because they streamed the album on Itunes for less than a week before the official release, that means it’s a Spotify holdout? Even though it was up on Spotify, Rdio, etc, the very same moment it was officially released on Itunes, retail stores, and elsewhere?

            Vail, CO Thursday, June 13, 2013

            “Release date” means nothing unless you’re Beyonce. When someone gets it that’s you’re “release date”

            Lynch Thursday, June 13, 2013

            Well then if thats the case, Itunes didn’t get the first release either! The album leaked in mid-May, so tens of thousands of people had already been listening to a free pirated copy by the time they streamed it on Itunes (a week before their “official” release).

            Me Thursday, June 13, 2013

            They were holding out on iTunes so the torrent sites could have an exclusive.

            Adam Thursday, June 13, 2013

            Paul – when did the sales of those 91,000 units start? If it’s the same day as it was on Spotify then you’re just full of it again.

            Paul Resnikoff Thursday, June 13, 2013

            Pre-orders roll into the first week figures, pre-rls date. I’m looking at the stats shared with me, it confirms that.

            Adam Thursday, June 13, 2013

            So by your definition all iTunes pre-sales (which are essentially all releases) are held back from Spotify?

            Paul Resnikoff Thursday, June 13, 2013

            Sorry, that does not compute.

            Visitor Friday, June 14, 2013

            Or all pre-orders from Amazon count as itunes/spotify holdouts?

            Bad Form Thursday, June 13, 2013

            C’mon Paul. An exclusive stream isn’t the same as a Spotify “hold-out”. As the gentleman stated above, that would be the same as saying they held out on FYE/Amazon/Rhapsody/every other music distributor/streaming service. Same thing as with Daft Punk…

            You should probably take this one down from your site. Bad form.

            sincerely,

            A fan of your work (usually).

            Paul Resnikoff Thursday, June 13, 2013

            I’d ask you to reconsider the premise of this logic, which may look good on a chalkboard but doesn’t translate as neatly into reality. The reason is that digital and physical have very differing rules and oftentimes differing audiences, demographics, and buying patterns.

            The focus of this piece is largely digital. Simply stated, digital access on one platform (ie, iTunes) and not another (ie, Spotify) means one is getting access and the other isn’t (ie, an exclusive).

            Thanks for considering my perspective on this.

            Me Thursday, June 13, 2013

            I get where you’re coming from on this (exclusive pre-streams on iTunes drives up download sales & gives iTunes a strong edge), but using the term “hold out” is blatantly misleading. Nowhere did QotSA (nor Daft Punk)indicate their album would not be available on Spotify. By calling them holdouts you are labeling them as something they are not.

            Also, why are you only calling them Spotify holdouts? By your logic, they are also Amazon holdouts, Rdio holdouts, Rhapsody holdouts, Muve holdouts, eMusic holdouts, etc. Why don’t you address that?

            Paul Resnikoff Thursday, June 13, 2013

            I think that’s a good criticism, it may be a poor choice of wording, I can see that perspective. Then again, Queens, Daft Punk, and Vampire all withheld for a week or more, while handing iTunes a very plum exclusive. So basically, I’m attempting to highlight that windowing and exclusive preference is happening here in the initial sales period. I am pointing out a developing trend.

            In terms of the selection of streaming service. ‘Spotify’ is the lead dog here, they are the first (or close to first) streaming platform that will be considered in release strategies. So, if Rhapsody suddenly gains 5 million subscribers tomorrow, I’ll talk about them more.

            Me Thursday, June 13, 2013

            But they weren’t withholding anything from Spotify (well, Vampire Weekend withheld for a week, but not DP or QotSA). Yes, this is a developing trend, but by singling out Spotify, and calling these bands Spotify holdouts you are not being objective and losing creativity. You seem to be wearing your personal vendetta against Spotify on your sleeve. There are better ways to go about proving your point than fudging the facts.

            Paul Resnikoff Thursday, June 13, 2013

            I’m losing creativity? 😉

            On your ‘fudging’ accusation. Respectfully, I’ve laid out the facts above: dates of windowing, sales figures, official release dates, etc. The beauty of this forum is that everything written is routinely scrutinized, and corrected if incorrect (in the most humbling ways sometimes).

            Instead, this debate is largely about how to interpret the facts, or a reaction to my interpretation of the facts, not the veracity of the data presented.

            Me Thursday, June 13, 2013

            Speaking of which… your dates are incorrect. Modern Vampires official release date was March 14. It was streaming on iTunes a week before that.

            Also your “data” is misleading. This isn’t about windowing. This is about iTunes getting a leg up on the competition.

            Paul Resnikoff Friday, June 14, 2013

            Actually, the headers in that grid don’t quite apply to Vampire Weekend, and yes, the streaming exclusive started even earlier. I’ll update that.

            The rest, as I’d mentioned, is interpretation. If you don’t think that’s windowing (with full iTunes release before Spotify), then that’s certainly an opinion (not sure how defensible, but an opinion and interpretation nonetheless).

            Me Friday, June 14, 2013

            But it’s not a FULL iTunes release. You couldn’t download it until the same day it was on Spotify.

            (*Btw, earlier when I said you were losing creativity, I mean to say credibility. That was a typo on my part. Sorry.)

            Champion Thursday, June 13, 2013

            This site is so ridiculous.

            Popular music is #1. It doesn’t have anything to do with Spotify.

            Lynch Thursday, June 13, 2013

            In this case I completely agree. They have sold more copies in the first week (on an indie label) than they previously had with Era Vulgaris (when they were with Interscope). Why? These guys understand what makes their fans tick. From the cryptic phone messages, to the errie video clips and artwork, and all the rest they have done over the past 4 months, they have single handedly created such a buzz over this album that people were sitting on the edge of their seats in ancticipation. They began putting out video’s for each song on Youtube weeks before Itunes got it’s “exclusive” streaming, all of those videos either surpassing or getting close to 1 million views within 48 hours of being posted. I can think of a few dozen friends who pre-ordered the record long before all of this as well (myself included). The whole “Itunes exclusive” plays a miniscule part in why this album is #1.

            shutupalready Thursday, June 13, 2013

            The preorder and audio samples were live on iTunes for a month prior HOLY SHIT ITUNES HAD A MONTHLONG EXCLUSIVE SAMPLER, YOU GUYS.

            Visitor Thursday, June 13, 2013

            “This is now the third major artist to withhold a release from Spotify while giving preferential access to iTunes”

            And the message is extremely powerful:

            Want new music? Go to iTunes!

            While Spotify slowly turns into a site where you listen to old stuff that doesn’t sell that much anymore.

            GGG Thursday, June 13, 2013

            I think this argument is not really as straight forward as people want to make it, and I think the logic is a little flawed. I understand that having a stream with a pre-order button underneath will certainly grab some impulse buys, but you seem to be making the argument that streaming via a program that gives you money for plays (however nominal) is significantly worse than a program that doesn’t give you money for plays but makes it easier for someone to maybe buy your record. It’s just kinda weird. QotSA are a pretty popular band, especially overseas. It’s not too far-fetched to assume a lot of those 91K people would buy this album regardless. Especially since they’ve done that number in the past before Spotify even existed and this was their first album in almost 7 years.

            Me Thursday, June 13, 2013

            I agree. This is a veteran band (Their debut album was released 15 years ago), and have built up quite a following over the years. There are a lot of factors at play here – Previous successful albums; the return of Nick Oliveri (singing backup vocals on two tracks); Dave Grohl on drums (on 5 tracks); big name guests (Elton John, Trent Reznor, Mark Lanegan, Brody Dalle); their first record for Matador; and the fact that this has been the longest period in between releases for the band (6 years).

            Anti Spotify FanBoy Thursday, June 13, 2013

            So DMN points out that iTunes gets the exclusive and this is the reaction? Spotify’s got the new fanboys.

            Me Thursday, June 13, 2013

            No, he’s not just “pointing this out.” He’s presenting it in a misleading manner. Instead of just stating that iTunes has exclusive streams before the album is available anywhere else, he’s wrongfully calling these bands Spotify holdouts, when they clearly are not.

            Visitor Friday, June 14, 2013

            “calling these bands Spotify holdouts, when they clearly are not”

            Sure they are. Here’s a suggestion for Spotify’s new slogan:

            Spotify — Oldies but Goodies!

            Me Friday, June 14, 2013

            And I’m guessing you’ve never used Spotify or any other streaming service. There’s a plethora of new albums on these services. In fact, the opposite of what you’re saying is true. The older bands are the ones that are more likely to hold out (Beatles, Led Zeppelin, etc.) than new artists.

            Visitor Friday, June 14, 2013

            “And I’m guessing you’ve never used Spotify”

            Of course not, why would I? I like new music.

            And I can find everything I want on iTunes and YouTube.

            Me Friday, June 14, 2013

            With all due respect, if you haven’t used the service, you have no business criticizing it’s “content.” If you want to criticize it’s payouts, that’s fine. But to criticize a service’s product without ever using it is just being flat out ignorant.

            Visitor Saturday, June 15, 2013

            Let’s try again:

            I want the latest music as soon as it’s available.

            You can’t use Spotify for that.

            Me Monday, June 17, 2013

            Yes you can.

            Yves Villeneuve Thursday, June 13, 2013

            I think the idea here is to pre-empt Amazon, not Spotify.

            Giving Rhapsody an exclusive pre-release stream over Spotify would make sense since Rhapsody pays more on average. I would promote Rhapsody over Spotify’s meagre payouts, any day.

            Any way you look at it, doesn’t make sense to give Spotify a pre-release stream exclusive.

            Disclaimer: I’m a Spotify holdout.

            Shoe Fits Thursday, June 13, 2013
            hold·out
            /ˈhōldˌout/
            Noun
            An act of resisting something or refusing to accept what is offered.

            Stu Friday, June 14, 2013

            It’s not streaming on iTunes any more, is it? They’ve PULLED IT FROM ITUNES in favour of Spotify? QOTSA DENY ITUNES STREAMING ALBUM headline on the way? 😉

            Visitor Friday, June 14, 2013

            See the pattern here? NO!!!

            Paul, do you really believe that a one week Spotify hold out is good for a #1 album? That’s scary…

            Stephen Friday, June 14, 2013

            You got werked. Thanks to MusicAlly for eloquently pointing out that DMN is sensationalist tripe.

            http://musically.com/2013/06/14/daft-punk-vampire-weekend-and-queens-of-the-stone-age-arent-spotify-holdouts/

            Me Friday, June 14, 2013

            Thank you! This is everything I’ve been trying to say in these comments, only more eloquently put.

            Hashbury Friday, June 14, 2013

            Paul – linkbaiting aside, isn’t the real story here that iTunes has changed their strategy? I don’t recall these kind of exclusives before streaming (and specifically Spotify) began gaining traction. And even if I’m wrong and they did occasionally do a pre-release stream, this clearly is a new emphasis on setting up these deals for major releases.

            I’d argue that this is a significant crack in Steve Jobs’ original ownership philosophy. iTunes is acknowledging that consumers want streaming.

            Perhaps your next post should be about how iTunes is protecting their “old” ownership model by refusing to provide an on-demand streaming option to their consumers. That’s the lede here.

            Visitor Friday, June 14, 2013

            “iTunes is acknowledging that consumers want streaming.”

            Consumers want free cars and eternal life, guess what they get.

            What Apple wants is to make iTunes the place you go for music.

            The interesting part is that they may succeed.

            oldtimer Friday, June 14, 2013

            Paul, you ever watched the movie Groundhog Day, featuring Bill Murray?

            Think you’d really dig it

            HansH Friday, June 14, 2013

            Best comment so far! Brilliant!

            R.P. Friday, June 14, 2013

            expect less and less of these “holdouts” http://mashable.com/2013/06/14/pink-floyd-spotify/

            old school industry dude Friday, June 14, 2013

            91,000 ‘album’ sales=#1 album.

            that’s so sad.

            that’s all for now.

            Visitor Friday, June 14, 2013

            True.

            Solve the mainstream piracy problem, or it’ll be 9,100 in 2023.

            HansH Friday, June 14, 2013
            How?

            GGG Friday, June 14, 2013

            You know, by complaining. That seems to be the industry’s go-to method at the moment.

            Visitor Friday, June 14, 2013

            “You know, by complaining”

            Yes, that does work!

            Everybody is listening now — even Google!

            HansH Friday, June 14, 2013

            “Everybody is listening now”

            Are you sure?

            GGG Friday, June 14, 2013

            Yes, and so timely, too! Napster only happened last millenium.

            Why find a real solution when you can bitch for over a decade?

            HansH Friday, June 14, 2013

  19. Zack

    ME is right on this one. It’s not that you’re wrong Paul, but the heading is absolutely misleading. The strategy here (and hence, the story) is that iTunes gets a leg up on everyone else, not that Queens exclusively turned their backs to Spotify. Sure, in the most technical sense you can call it a Spotify holdout and put it in the heading. In that case, you could’ve also wrote the heading to the effect of QOTSA being Amazon holdouts. But this scenario doesn’t really have much to with Amazon, yeah?

    ME’s point is that you’ve singled out Spotify for the story, when this is really more a story about iTunes windowing. I know you may not have written it to be biased, but it does come off that way.

    Reply
  20. wallow-T

    Isn’t this the functional equivalent of sending pre-release promo physical copies to stores in the hope that in-store plays will generate interest in advance of the release date?

    Reply
  21. pssst....

    the unwritten, unspoken rule is that iTunes reserves the right to NOT position/promote/market a release throughout their site if an album stream is provided to any other online retailer.

    there.

    now i have to kill you.

    Reply

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