The RIAA Asks Jammie Thomas to Publicly Support Anti-Piracy to Lower Her $222,000 Fine…

Wired.com reported today that the RIAA had asked Jammie Thomas-Rasset, who was convicted of file-sharing in a case that began in 2007, to “publicly extol the virtues of the Recording Industry Association of America’s anti-piracy platform.”  In exchange, Thomas’ $222,000 fine would be reduced.

pirate

Although details of this exchange were general and abstract, it is concrete that Thomas is “pretty opposed” to this proposition by the RIAA.  Thomas’ attorney, Michael Wilson, would rather consider the option for Thomas to file for bankruptcy protection.

Thomas herself has indicated that she would rather go bankrupt.

Image by Oliver Bruchez, Licenced under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC by 2.0)

32 Responses

  1. Chris

    Put the thief in JAIL – that’s where criminals belong. He can join that piece of shit Pirate Bay founder Gottfrid Svartholm rotting in a cell.

    Reply
    • Visitor

      “Put the thief in JAIL”
      I don’t believe in jails and I also think people should have a second chance.
      However, I do understand if people lose their patience in the case of Ms. Thomas.
      She not only got a second, but a third, fourth and fifth chance — and she blew them all.

      Reply
    • Zimmler

      Ja wohl mein Führer! We are loading Jammie Thomas-Rassett and all the pirating teenagers on to the trains now, and will be transfering them to the camps very soon. On arrival they will go through the usual “disinfection” process. The pirate-bolschewist world-conspiracy will be ausrotten.

      Reply
      • Visitor

        Again, I don’t think prison is neccessary for Ms. Thomas. The fines seem fair, considering her crimes.
        However, it is a fact that every country in the world uses jail sentences to prevent theft.
        That’s obviously not because governments all around the globe are evil Nazi regimes.
        It’s because they wish to protect their citizens from criminals.
        If they didn’t, thieves would indeed steal everything you own.
        And bear in mind that publishing other people’s Intellectual Property without written permission is worse than common theft.
        Today, it is more and more often argued that illegal uploaders should be treated like criminals who make counterfeit money.
        And they do go to jail.
        That’s the way they treat pirates in Japan now and we already see the predicted, positive effects on music sales.

        Reply
      • Get out of here you dinosaur!

        Turn away you paleolithic idiot. Fly back to the barren caves from wence you came from!
        Stop living in the past you delusional f*ck. Piracy is here to stay whether you like it or not. The RIAA is a comical organization meant to seem important and they’re about as useful as FEMA was circa 2005.

        Reply
        • Visitor

          “Piracy is here to stay”
          Nope, the party’s over.
          Music sales rose for in 2012 for the first time in 14 years!
          Source: Financial Times, February 26, 2013:
          http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/f7b0f2b0-8009-11e2-adbd-00144feabdc0.html#axzz2MNEc5fTL
          And that’s exactly what right holders said would happen after MegaUpload’s fall.
          That specific event will be remembered not only as the beginning of the first internationally co-ordinated war on piracy ever, but also as the event that finally ended the Piracy Decade.

          Reply
        • The man

          Ooh look at me I used a dictionary to look up a witty comeback.She deprived others of their livelihood by stealing. “Piracy is here to stay” – so are jails and the sooner she and her ilk are put in them the better it will be.I’m not living in the past. I’m living in a world where we are slowly but surely catching up with you thieves

          Reply
    • Tune Hunter

      Let him go free! RIAA has to urgentlly force to sale only all ID services. Most likely it was Google lyrics, or Shazam, or Soundhound that made him a criminal. Time to put those guys to work for Music Industry not for pirates!
      Some say ID services operate under fair use guidelines. Possibly for an individual sporadicaly using ID service – definitely not for Shazam or Google making millions from advertising while processing someone’s intelectual property – they are criminals!
      It is a shame that Shazam with 350 million users has lost $ 5million last year on helping freeloaders to get what they want.
      By now, it should be billion dollar music retailer looking for 5 billion IPO.
      Well, just whizz kids blinded by science and scrooged by the labels!

      Reply
  2. Visitor

    Ms. Thomas is not only unpleasant (blaming her children for her crimes) and simple-minded (saying no to yet a generous offer), she’s also a very boring cry baby.

    Reply
    • Jimmy Jam

      There is no bigger cry baby in the history of music than the RIAA.

      Reply
      • Visitor

        Ever heard of Tim Westergren? 🙂
        The Recording Industry Association of America reacts exactly like any other crime victim.

        Reply
    • tune Hunter

      Still let her go free!
      It is not her or her kids to be blamed for ongoing piracy.
      Put hot iron into rear ends of corporate players who support, accept or participate in piracy – proteted by government Google is #1.
      If you remove the tools to steal there will be no piracy.
      Best yet lets use those tools for monetization of media – Google with current market position can double it’s revenue with total commitment to media monetization. Tere is 100 billions of annual revenues hidden in just music.

      Reply
  3. Visitor

    Here’s what the victims said:
    “In the past, for example, we have reached out to Ms. Thomas to settle the case in exchange for a contribution to a local music charity. We have communicated to Ms. Thomas that we would consider a variety of non-monetary settlement options, which is up to her to offer. We think this is a gesture of a good will and we’re doing what we can to resolve this case in a manner that works for everyone.”
    Recording Industry Association of America

    Reply
  4. Pinko

    This reminds me of Al Qaeda or the Taliban, forcing their prisoners to make a video statement blaming the western world and supporting their islamic war, before they behead them.
    Its great to see how this courageous woman, stand up to these extortionists.

    Reply
    • Visitor

      “this courageous woman”
      Who blamed her own kids for her crimes…

      Reply
      • Pinko

        I know the details of her case, but it wouldn’t be unlikely at all that it was her (perhaps teenage) children, who shared a few files.

        Reply
      • Visitor

        After her kids, she blamed her boyfriend.
        One perjury after another.
        The woman is trash personified.

        Reply
    • Chris

      She’s not a ‘courageous woman’ standing up to ‘extortionists’ she’s a THIEF. She took something that wasn’t her’s and despite numerous opportunities to pay for her CRIME in a lesser way she thought she’d play silly buggers and blame everyone else for it. Well it backfired and she should rightly pay the penalty for breaking the law.Even now when offered ANOTHER way out she probably wont take the opportunity.To liken her getting a fine for STEALING to the Taliban shows what utter idiots you freetards are

      Reply
      • Pinko

        No, she is not a thief, because she didn’t steal anything. The claim is that she violated some extremely wealthy peoples right to copy a small number of files. The definition of stealing according to the OED is as follows: “[with object] take (another person’s property) without permission or legal right and without intending to return it”.
        “To liken her getting a fine for STEALING to the Taliban shows what utter idiots you freetards are.”
        Obviously I was not refering to the fine, but to the demand that she should make a statement supporting an organization, which has been harassing her for 7 years. Now that you mentioned the fine though, demanding such a huge amount of money from a struggeling mother of 3, in order to create fear among the general population, is just sick and immoral. Her possible wrong-doing is nothing compared to what she has been put through by these corporate bullies. That she has been strong enough to stand up against them until the very end, unquestionably shows a lot of fortitude and courage. Having financial ruin hanging over your head for 7 years is not easy for anyone. She must be a woman of strong principles. If they had made a reasonable demand from the start, in the range of perhaps 100-150 dollars, then the case would have been different. Demanding 222.000 dollars is just revolting.

        Reply
  5. Visitor

    This whole thing is ridiculous. How old is this case now? Why are we still talking about it? She (or her kids) did what millions (billions?) of people around the world were doing at the time. She was unlucky enough to be chosen as the RIAA’s example and now they have no choice but to keep this thing open so as not to send a message that they will eventually back down.

    Reply
    • Visitor

      “Why are we still talking about it?”
      Because she’s a pathetic drama queen, crying all the time. You ain’t nuthin’ but a…

      Reply
    • Visitor

      “The fine is just ludicrous”
      Well, yes you could argue it’s in the low end.
      It’s not only far from the $150,000 max per infringement — it’s even way less than the $22,500 Tenenbaum was told to pay per song last month.

      Reply
      • Visitor

        And it’s considerably less than the original $4-5k settlement offer she turned down…

        Reply
  6. Common Sense

    The only good thing named Jammie are Jammie Dodgers, because they’re delicious.
    Anyway, this moron needs to quit faffing around, and just pay the damn fine. She committed a crime, she got caught. End of story.

    Reply
    • Visitor

      Sorry, but that won’t happend. This time you scumbags choose to harass the wrong lady, and all you will be left with is a huge bill from your lawyers. There is nothing you can do about it.

      Reply
  7. Visitor

    “there is nothing you can do about it”…
    Bullshit. Let her file for bankrupcy. Good luck living with that, then seven years later they can still come after her. In the meantime, we will find another one of you whiney-ass music pirates to slam to the ground and make your ass miserable for 4-5 years while it drags through court, with your lawyer promising “oh, we’ll win this, don’t you worry!”. I have no pitty whatsoever for you, her, or any of you scumbags.
    Have a lovely day:-)

    Reply

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