So I Just Downloaded a Torrent File *Directly* from Google Search…

It’s one thing to find a torrent site on Google Search.  But what about downloading a torrent file directly from Google Search itself?  Is that okay?

Here’s what happened while researching Team Arcade Sylenth1 torrents over the weekend (just like Steve Aoki’s assistant…)

sylenthresult1

sylenthresult2

sylenthresult3

sylenthresult4

But that’s just a custom skin, right?  Well, here’s another example that clearly involves a cracked, illegal version – and a direct download from Google Search.

sylenthresult5

 

sylenthresult6

55 Responses

  1. Jack
    Jack

    You don’t understand anything to technology.
    You actually “visited” the isohunt website, but it is like most of the download links on the web. They are designed to immediately sart the download and not transmit any other content. The only difference here is that it is crawled by google maybe thanks to / because of URL rewriting
    Pure genius 🙂

    Reply
    • Visitor
      Visitor

      “You don’t understand anything to technology.”
      You don’t understand copyright law.
      Google is now a piracy company exactly like the Pirate Bay!

      Reply
        • Visitor
          Visitor

          “Nothing has changed.”
          Are you saying that you previously have been able to download illegal files directly from Google’s own website?
          If that’s true, then they’re screwed.

          Reply
          • GGG
            GGG

            Yes and no. Downloading the torrent file is useless unless you actually DL all the bits of info of said file via a torrent. You could certainly argue the torrent file is illegal itself, and I’d agree, but it’s still useless. So you technically can’t download illegal content directly from Google.

          • Visitor
            Visitor

            “You could certainly argue the torrent file is illegal itself, and I’d agree, but it’s still useless”
            It’s illegal to buy guns where I live, which means it’s also illegal to buy ammunition or gun parts. (Best parallel I could come up with while watching tv, I’m sure you can think of a better one… 🙂
            A lawyer needs to look at this.

          • GGG
            GGG

            It’s a good enough analogy.
            But the point is more, and this is not me defending the illegality of it, that it’s really not any steps easier to actually get the file this way. Either you click the link and go to the actual site, hit DL and your torrent software opens up to start DLing or you right click and get the file without going to the site, then open up your torrent software and open the file up. You still have to actually torrent it, Google isn’t hosting any files.

          • Visitor
            Visitor

            I agree that it doesn’t make much difference for any practical purposes that Google offers illegal files directly within its own web site.
            But I do believe it can make a difference in court. It is the first time I have seen Google act in a way that I honestly think could kill them.

  2. It gets even better...
    It gets even better...

    From a surprisingly useful article on Mashable (I know, right?):

    10 Things You Didn’t Know Dropbox Could Do
    http://mashable.com/2012/10/26/dropbox-tips-and-tricks/
    Download Torrents Remotely
    Note: This Dropbox tip is intended for legal use only.
    If you’re away from your personal computer and you’d like to download bit torrent files, ready by the time you get home, Dropbox is a perfect tool.
    Just adjust the settings in your torrent program (uTorrent, BitTorrent, etc.) to automatically load your torrent in Dropbox.

    Reply
  3. Visitor
    Visitor

    “But what about downloading a torrent file directly from Google Search itself?”
    That’s shocking!
    So Google is now a direct piracy provider.
    Wonder how this will turn out in court. Could this kill Goliath?

    Reply
    • Visitor
      Visitor

      I sent a mail to the owner, I hope he’ll sue Google.
      This could be the event a lot of piracy victims have been waiting for.

      Reply
  4. Visitor
    Visitor

    OMG, I didn’t see Google’s direct Piracy Support:
    “ACTION:
    isoHunt link clicked.
    Download starts immediately within results page.”
    That last paragraph may break Google!
    I would show it to my lawyer today if I were Lennar Digital.

    Reply
  5. Visitor
    Visitor

    The .torrent file was still downloaded from isoHunt. If you must, install traffic monitoring software like Wireshark. Google simply linked to isoHunt, just like they always have. They don’t actually host the .torrent file.

    Reply
    • Visitor
      Visitor

      “The .torrent file was still downloaded from isoHunt”
      Google bypasses the criminal site and lets its users access illegal files directly from Google’s website!
      In Google’s own words:
      “Download starts immediately WITHIN RESULTS PAGE”

      Reply
      • Visitor
        Visitor

        “In Google’s own words:”
        …hm, if it’s not Paul’s words, of course…
        At any rate, fact is that we now can download criminal files directly within Google Search.

        Reply
  6. Visitor
    Visitor

    If Paul Resnikoff is a US citizen, he can:
    1. find a good lawyer (he probably arlready knows some from the Grooveshark fiasco)
    2. visit the FBI field office and explain what happened to an agent
    3. become famous as the person who put a Google executive in jail for federal crimes
    (I am tempted to put an extra “4. profit ???” but the Google fanboys don’t like their slang being used against their Gods)

    Reply
    • Visitor
      Visitor

      “become famous as the person who put a Google executive in jail for federal crimes”
      This is not about putting people in jail.
      Google is the number one piracy provider on the planet, and that can’t go on.

      Reply
  7. AnAmusedGeek
    AnAmusedGeek

    Umm – you guys realize this only works because you have bitTorrent installed and registered to handle .torrent files right ?

    Chrome (which you can tell paul used by the radial download progress meter) by default ASKS windows what to do with a file of a given type/extension.

    So basically, YOU configured your system to always download .torrent files via some torrent client, THEN you clicked on a link to a .torrent file and now your trying to blame google ?

    Seriously, loose the tin foil hats – google does enough evil shit without making stuff up….

    Reply
    • Paul Resnikoff
      Paul Resnikoff

      Umm back…
      “Chrome (which you can tell paul used by the radial download progress meter) by default ASKS windows what to do with a file of a given type/extension.”
      Windows? This is a Mac.

      “So basically, YOU configured your system to always download .torrent files via some torrent client, THEN you clicked on a link to a .torrent file and now your trying to blame google ?”
      I’ve never used this machine to download a torrent, there’s not torrent client on this Mac that I installed (or, for that matter, am aware of being on the computer when I bought it a few months ago).

      Reply
      • AnAmusedGeek
        AnAmusedGeek

        My bad – though OSX works the same way…
        _something_ on that system ‘understands’ .torrent files. The same way you can click on a ‘.doc’ link on the web and have office open (assuming office is installed). Otherwise, you’ll get a prompt asking what program to use to open the file, or a generic ‘text editor’ type of thing.

        I would be curious to know what app opens when you clicked on that ‘open’ link in the screen shot…

        Reply
        • GGG
          GGG

          You can download torrent files without torrent software, they will just sit there unopenable. There is no content on his computer, though. It’s basically a roadmap to the content. You can have a million .torrent files on your computer and it will still be like 1mb of space.

          Reply
          • AnAmusedGeek
            AnAmusedGeek

            Oh – he just got the .torrent?

            So basically, it does exactly what it does with any other ‘unknown’ file type – offers to save it to disk so you can figure it out later…

          • Paul Resnikoff
            Paul Resnikoff

            Right, in both cases it’s just the torrent pointer file. Not the completed cracked version. I didn’t try to open the downloaded torrent files, but if you wanted to, it’s pretty easy — get a client, and go.
            You’ll have a cracked version in no time I’m sure.

          • Visitor
            Visitor

            “You’ll have a cracked version in no time I’m sure.”
            Yes, you have indeed proved that Google is an illegal torrent site.
            This is big.
            What’s next?

  8. jw
    jw

    If you visit the cached page, you see what Google’s bots actually indexed.
    http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:l8kLMA1y5XEJ:isohunt.com/download/186773857+&cd=2&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us
    The page is a standard torrent listing.
    If I had to guess, I’d say isohunt is probably detecting where the referrer is coming from (google.com) & bypassing the html document & serving up the .torrent file instead in order to grab users from other torrent trackers.
    Clearly Google is the victim of a bait & switch… their bots obviously did not crawl or index the torrent file itself.

    Reply
    • Visitor
      Visitor

      “Clearly Google is the victim”
      Aw, pooor little Google!
      And here I thought that Lennar Digital was the victim.
      Silly me…

      Reply
      • jw
        jw

        I’m just explaining to you what’s going on, because clearly you have no idea how anything works. Your arguments are solely emotional.
        Obviously the person who uploaded the torrent & the site that hosts the torrent & is serving the torrent file instead of the torrent listing page are the ones doing wrong by Lennar Digital. I dunno why you’re all up in arms with Google, making outrageous & untrue statements.
        Silly you… as usual.

        Reply
  9. Visitor
    Visitor

    I just realized that a custom skin may be legal, even if it’s coming from a notorious warez/crack team (I’d have to check out this specific case).
    So, I added an example that clearly shows cracked version (with similar download action in search results) above (also isoHunt).
    Written while listening to Tame Impala.

    Reply
  10. David
    David

    Well presumably Google aren’t hosting the file themselves, but it does seem odd that the search result leads directly to a download, and not to a web page with a download link.
    I say ‘odd’ because it is surely in the interest of the pirate site itself (Isohunt in this case) for people to visit their web page where they will see adverts, premium service offers, etc, which make money for the pirates. If Google search ‘cuts out the middleman’, the pirates get nothing. Maybe they should sue Google!
    Since I don’t use pirate sites myself I don’t know how common this kind of direct download link is. Some kinds of search results, e.g. for academic papers, do often lead directly to a saveable document, like a PDF file or a Word Doc, but in this case I think Google flag up the type of document clearly in the search result e.g. by putting [PDF] in front of it. (Though I have seen exceptions.)
    I doubt that it makes much difference legally whether the search result leads you directly to the offending file or to a site where it is ‘just a click away’. Provided Google are not hosting the file themselves, they would just claim the usual ‘safe harbor’ exemption.

    Reply
    • Visitor
      Visitor

      “I doubt that it makes much difference legally whether the search result leads you directly to the offending file or to a site where it is ‘just a click away’.”
      And I think it makes all the difference legally that everybody now can see that:
      You can download illegal files directly within Google’s own site.
      Like you said: This practise is not in the interest of isoHunt. And it is not in the interest of Lennar Digital.
      So we can be sure that neither orchestrated it.
      That doesn’t leave us with many choices.
      A lawyer — or more likely an army of lawyers — have to look at this.

      Reply
        • Visitor
          Visitor

          Yeah, absolutely love it!
          Not that it’s relevant here, but the tube is a wonderful example of how easy it is to make a criminal site completely legitimate.
          So the good news is that Google already know what to do.
          The bad news is that they only made the tube legit because they had a cannon pointed at their heads.
          That’s why it’s so important to sue Google now! It’s the only language they respect!

          Reply
  11. Visitor
    Visitor

    Anybody try this with Yahoo or Bing? If it works the same, it won’t just break Google, it’ll break the whole freakin’ internet!

    Reply
  12. DUDE
    DUDE

    You are not downloading anything directly from Google dude, the torrent file is still being hosted by Isohunt and you still connecting to their servers to get the download… the only way this is any different from clicking through to Isohunt’s page and downloading from there is that the link is coded to save you one step and start the download straightaway without actually showing you a webpage
    Make an effort to understand the technology at work here before you post next time, saying you “never visted Isohunt” is wrong

    Reply
    • DUDE
      DUDE

      “But Google made him commit a crime that can cost him thousands of dollars!”
      Id give it about five minutes before this got laughed out of the courtroom
      Not that you’d have anything to worry about because its a torrent file and not actually a piece of cracked software until its opened and the torrent is leeched

      Reply
      • Visitor
        Visitor

        “Not that you’d have anything to worry about because its a torrent file”
        Wrong, it’s an illegal file.
        Illegal to upload, download and possess.

        Reply
        • DUDE
          DUDE

          Can you point me to a US law or legal precedent that would support this claim? As far as I know you’re completely wrong, the torrent file is basically a link to an illegally cracked piece of software and isnt illegal in and of itself

          Reply
          • Visitor
            Visitor

            “you’re completely wrong”
            No, you’re using the Pirate Bay-excuse and that’s not valid. The Pirate Bay is illegal, the people behind it are convicted criminals.
            And Google is now operating a business that is exactly as illegal as the Pirate Bay.

          • DUDE
            DUDE

            Nice dodge but something you think should be illegal and something that is actually illegal are two very different things dude… has the precedent actually been set by someone with legal authority in the US? Far as I know the ‘Pirate Bay excuse’ is perfectly valid whether you like it or not
            Google’s search engine is also not hosting any torrent files, just because a webpage doesnt appear when you start the download doesnt mean your file is being hosted on Googles servers. The Pirate Bay actually DOES host the torrent files, which is quite a bit different than linking you to them on another server and different still from actually hosting a direct download of copyrighted content
            It would probably help you argue your case more coherently if you made an effort to understand the technology at work here, Im just sayin

          • Visitor
            Visitor

            Let me repeat what I said to GGG:
            Google is now indistinguishable from illegal torrent sites for all practical purposes.
            And whether you happen to be aware that tpb and similar sites are criminal is not relevant.
            They are in the eye of the law. That’s why they run from country to country these days. And that’s why governments all over world, including the US, try to stop them.
            But perhaps it’ll be easier to stop Google.

    • David
      David

      Sure, but why is Isohunt configuring its site in such a way that Google can link directly to downloadable files? Isohunt is itself a search engine, so allowing another search engine to bypass its main page (with all the ads, etc) would be like Google allowing Bing to use Google search results without showing Google ads. Makes no sense.

      Reply
      • DUDE
        DUDE

        Some sort of mistake or oversight on Isohunt’s part seems like the likeliest explanation to me dude
        Or it could be Isohunt’s webmaster just doesnt care, judging from the lack of ads on Isohunt’s front page money is not their top proirity

        Reply
    • Visitor
      Visitor

      “You are not downloading anything directly from Google dude”
      Let me explain how it works:
      A curious but completely innocent and law abiding DigitalMusicNews reader wants to know what all the Aoki fuzz is about.
      So he googles “Sylenth1 team arcade” and gets 3,190 results,
      He looks at them and thinks:
      “Hm, isohunt… what is that place anyway?”
      So he clicks the link — and commits a crime! Without wanting to do so.
      He just wanted to see the site. And there are no laws against that.
      But Google made him commit a crime that can cost him thousands of dollars!

      Reply
      • GGG
        GGG

        That’s not how it works. If the person doesn’t have torrent software they will not get anything.
        If they did, 1) they would know what clicking on isohunt means, and 2) if their software was set up to immediately start the DL, they could cancel it immediately. It’s not like software will download in 3 seconds.

        Reply
        • Visitor
          Visitor

          “If the person doesn’t have torrent software they will not get anything”
          Yes, he will get an illegal file — thanks to Google.
          Though he never wanted it.

          Reply
          • GGG
            GGG

            It’s not even really a file. It’s basically, to continue your analogy from above, a map to a gun dealer. There is 100% zero content contained on that file or on your computer until you actually get the data from a torrent.

          • Visitor
            Visitor

            “It’s not even really a file”
            Yes, it is indeed a file, it is illegal, and it is downloaded without the user’s intention, knowledge or consent — courtesy of Google.
            GGG, I know what you mean, but this is where the lawyers step in. It has to be sorted out in court.

          • GGG
            GGG

            Is a map to a drug dealer’s house illegal?
            I also just went to this exact link in both Safari and Firefox and neither had a download start automatically.

          • Visitor
            Visitor

            “This is why it took over a decade to fight piracy, because nobody took the time to actually understand what was going on”
            I agree to some extent: Like many right holders, I don’t have any hands-on experience with piracy. My knowledge is entirely theoretical. I’m only experienced in the receiving end, so to speak.
            And there’s no doubt that you can provide very valuable information about piracy and pirates.
            So do it!
            I don’t agree however, that you have to know all the finer aspects of this or that type of crime to fight it.
            Too much attention to details can make it hard — or even impossible — to see the big picture.
            And the big picture shows a Google that is indistinguishable from illegal torrent sites for any practical purposes.

          • Visitor
            Visitor

            Oh please GGG, now you’re using the Pirate Bay-excuse, too:
            Nooo, we’re innocent — we don’t host no illegal files!
            Everybody knows how that works out in court…

          • GGG
            GGG

            No, simply pointing out that your anti-piracy crusade, however correct you are in doing so, hits a wall every time you talk about it because you clearly have no idea how anything works. This is why it took over a decade to fight piracy, because nobody took the time to actually understand what was going on.

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