Yngwie Malmsteen: The Music Industry Died Because of Piracy…

Legendary Swedish guitarist Yngwie Malmsteen was recently interviewed by Classic Rock Revisited writer Justin R. Beckner about the decline of and changes in the music industry.  Here are a few excerpts…

 

yngwiemalmsteen

CRR: “The Internet changed a lot for the industry; piracy has certainly had a hand in changing the game. Do you think that piracy can be beneficial to some of those bands starting out? How has it affected you?

Yngwie: “How could it possibly be positive? If you go into a store and you see a car that you like, you can’t just drive off with it. The cost and the blood and sweat and tears that go into making music is the same thing, it’s not free. Try telling the engineer and the producer that they have to work for free. It’s utterly bizarre. It’s like just going into a store and taking things off the shelves. It’s stealing.

“The reason there are no bands coming out now is that the money that was once there is not there anymore. So what happened was, in essence, by pirating music, you kill the music industry.

“The music industry died because of the piracy, and now all the fans will have no new music. Isn’t that wonderful? It’s a direct consequence of that.”

 

CRR: “I think that, with piracy, we’ve lost the album art, the liner notes, the waiting in line to get the next record. It seems that there used to be this aura of awesomeness that used to surround a new record being released. Now it’s just a click away. One sad little click.”

Yngwie: “Yeah, that’s another aspect of it that I totally agree with what you’re saying.  But I think that kind of got lost with the CD a little bit too.

 

“I think when the LP went, that’s when the art went.”

 

You know, when I was a little kid, I used to record cassette tapes for friends.  So this music sharing thing has been going on for a long time and the internet just sped it up.”

 

57 Responses

  1. Visitor
    Visitor

    It’s funny…
    2-3 years ago, nobody dared to stand up in public and say what everybody feels, that pirates suck.
    But today?
    The cat’s definitely out of the bag now.

    Reply
    • AnAmusedGeek
      AnAmusedGeek

      Hopefully you guys can move on to other issues now. I’m really surprised there wasn’t more comment on Paul’s article a while back about the buying habits of teens / young adults. As long as they consider buying an album ‘doing the artist a favor’ your gonna be hard pressed to make headway.
      Without some serious customer education, it sounds like a lot of touring and youtube in the future.

      Reply
      • Visitor
        Visitor

        “Hopefully you guys can move on to other issues now”
        Haha, yeah I’m sure you’d like that, but this is just the beginning…

        Reply
          • GGG
            GGG

            You don’t listen to music? Why are you on a music industry site? Also, who doesn’t listen to music?

          • AnAmusedGeek
            AnAmusedGeek

            I’ve watched the transition of a lot of industry’s…
            first software publishers got shafted
            Then photographers got shafted
            (all those new fangled web sites needed pretty pix! )
            Then bloggers got hit with all the ‘content aggregation’ stuff
            and traditional paper authors moved to digital
            (they seemed to have the smoothest transition so far..)
            I’m sure in a few years I’ll be watching how movies/tv deal with it. Its also interesting to learn a lil about how your stuff all works (Dam! you guys got some complicated hoops to jump thru to get paid..)

            P.S.
            yes, I’m not really a music buff – 10 minutes of the oldies station once a week on the way to the grocery store is about it for me. I’m more of a book person…

          • Marmuro
            Marmuro

            Amused Geek…. if you listen to no music at all, then you have no soul.

            You must be at porn sites all day long, if that’s your drug of choice, oh well… not much to reply, you’re not really worth it.
            Long live Malmsteen, that guy is absolutely right. LP was amazing, the awesomeness that they speak about is totally true. I feel sad for the people that couldn’t have that experience. Music was multisensorial, a vinyl you could even smell it… not joking. It was all that and a bag of chips.

    • Visitor
      Visitor

      More and more artists are speaking out, and it’s about time.

      The Smoking Gun of Internet Exploitation of Musicians and Songwriters

      Reply
    • Visitor
      Visitor

      All this is BS – immature children whining about losing money they were never entitled to.
      This is the best thing that could happen to music – idiots and egomaniacs like Yngwie will drop out and those who love music – NOT those who only want to be rock stars – will stay.
      Guys like Yngwie don’t understand economics – if you can make unlimited copies of something for no cost then the value of the product MUST go down, and when you have an unlimited inventory pirating costs the musician NOTHING! They have found that people who pirate spend 3 TIMES as much on legitimate music than those who don’t. Sharing (what idiots like this call piracy) is the #1 way new music is discovered by fans.
      What this means is that artists need to make money from performances, not sitting in an ivory tower and dumping what they think is good music on the masses.

      Reply
      • Visitor
        Visitor

        Are you in the music business ? How do you support yourself ?
        What is your occupation ? Did you go to school to learn your skills ?
        If so , did you pay for that education ? Did you study, practice on your own time without pay developing that skill so you hoped to one day make your living exercising that skill everyday ?
        What other endeavor engages humans beings the world over like music in all it’s forms , individually and collectively ? How many book authors engage in arena tours, outdoor festivals to illustrate the point of how music effects human beings on a grand scale not to mention on ther personal which usually happens 1st when someone hear something and makes the hair on the back of their neck stand up.
        You rattle off comments about how some musicians just don’t know economics ……… We’re very familiar with the real effects of declining revenue due to one industry that facilitated this ( I-T ) upheaval in the first place telling the legacy bizness ( recorded music) that there’s a new sherriff in town and we’re doing away with your modus operandi for making money and there’s nothing you can do about it, AND , MF’s , we’re creating a scenario where all your future customers believe that what you do should be free,and I hope you’re not 45-50 + years old
        Whatever your bisness is , I’ll be there tomorrow and with a pack of engineer’s, lawyers, and all round smartest-people-in-the- world with the news that your livelyhood will now be stood on it’s collective ear and good luck with your job at Mickey D’s ! If you can manage to live on minimum wage…

        Reply
        • Sam

          Amazing! From now on when you go to work, don’t expect to get paid…but go anyway and like it. That’s what piracy has done to digital content.
          The other side of this is the culpability of the record industry and their lack of artist development. Going for a pre-packaged artist/band and pushing singles to radio isn’t moving the industry forward. It’s short-sighted and a big reason why video games have taken up leisure time and any spending that would have been available for music.
          Like it or not, those are the facts.

          Reply
  2. GGG
    GGG

    “The reason there are no bands coming out now is that the money that was once there is not there anymore. So what happened was, in essence, by pirating music, you kill the music industry. The music industry died because of the piracy, and now all the fans will have no new music. Isn’t that wonderful? It’s a direct consequence of that.”
    While in the macro sense I don’t 100% disagree with what he’s saying about piracy, this string of sentences might be the dumbest thing I’ve ever seen said by an old person with an obvious lack of understanding of the modern music culture.
    Piracy has allowed so many more crappy to great bands get noticed and play larger rooms/festivals than they would have if hearing them depended on CD sales. Whether you want to admit it or not, the indie music scene THRIVES because of piracy. It certainly hurts once you get past a certain level of notoriety, but it also makes going from regional popularity to national popularity infinitely easier.

    Reply
    • AnAmusedGeek
      AnAmusedGeek

      Isn’t that what the whole ‘discovery’ thing is about? And the ‘playing for exposure’ (playing for free…)
      for that matter, you can just upload your stuff to youtube right? and even get a couple of bucks if people watch it ??

      I’m not seeing how piracy is neccessary for any of that ?

      Reply
      • GGG
        GGG

        Yes, you’re right. But one of my issues is there are both positives and negatives to it. And the obvious gut reaction to piracy is that it lost everyone money, which it obviously did. What people fail to even want to look at is what rose from that. Now, I don’t know what data would really back me up except looking at growth of indie music exposure, festivals, etc in the last decade, but I really don’t think you’d see this much of a growth in the indie world without piracy. When tastemakers like Pitchfork review 10+ albums a week, people aren’t going to want to buy all those, they pirate, or now, stream them. When people see a festival bill and see 15+ bands on the undercard they don’t know, they aren’t going to buy all those, they pirate or stream. When some band-du-jour is getting a ton of hype, people don’t even wanna buy that a lot of the time, in case they don’t like it.
        The reason Yngwie’s statement is so ridiculously stupid is that TOO MUCH music is one reason piracy grew. People in the indie world don’t want to be or feel left out. They have to know everything, but sure as hell aren’t going to pay for it. And since every blog needs new content every 30 minutes, every bland act on the planet gets their 15 minutes of internet fame to varying extents.

        Reply
        • AnAmusedGeek
          AnAmusedGeek

          I would agree with the ’embarassment of riches’ part of that – there is soo much information available now (not just music, but news, writing, etc. etc.) that its virtually impossible to keep up.
          I would have imagined that would have led to a corresponding rise in ‘taste makers’ but that stubbornly refuses to happen. Whether its news or music, people still seem to use the same methods and outlets to filter thru stuff
          for instance, in music, it seems ‘friends’ are still the number 1 recommendation engine ?

          Reply
          • GGG
            GGG

            Yea, I think that’s part of the long-tail idea not working out exactly as imagined that Paul has posted about a couple times. So I agree friends are still the number one tool of discovery, but there will always be one or two or three places that people trust. And Pitchfork is THE trusted indie tastemaker. I mean, bands have gotten major label deals from literally one song being hyped up on there (Cults).

  3. Visitor
    Visitor

    Yes the funniest was when he said that there is no new artists and no new music…WTF!!!
    Just use the new paradigms and reinvent how you sell yourself as an artist and product and there will be more money for more artists than ever before. I remember being part of the record insustry in the late eighties / early ninties and it was really hard to even get some recordlabel to listen to you bad or good… and it was expensive as hell to make a good recording and publish it etc,,, think that there was a lot of bands and musicians that gave up just because of this!
    Now if you are good you will be heard if you are inventive and make the internet work for you. Sharing and all.

    Reply
    • Visitor
      Visitor

      “it was expensive as hell to make a good recording and publish it etc”
      Only difference is that it’s waaay more expensive today.
      And forget about development, no labels can afford that anymore.

      Reply
      • GGG
        GGG

        False. I can get you fantastic rates with fantastic producers who have fantastic sounding gear. Is it cheap? Of course not, but certainly not remotely bankrupt-inducing. You always say how expensive it is to make your pop stuff. You should find a new studio, because they’re ripping you off. Not to mention, you can distribute your record world-wide for $50
        Also false. Plenty of labels can afford it, they just choose not to or are not allowed to. They throw all their money at acts with a higher chance at short-term gains instead of spending half as much starting lower key on one with depth.

        Reply
        • Visitor
          Visitor

          GGG, you obviously don’t have any real life experience.
          Music production is indeed way more expensive than ever.
          Here are the facts:
          Broadcast quality instruments are way more expensive than ever. And yes, musicians still use them. You know Gibsons, Fenders, Steinways (physical ones, thank you very much), brass, drums, synths; all of it is way more expensive than ever.
          Gear is way more expensive than ever. Contrary to what you seem to believe, hits are not produced on a stolen Cubase copy in mom’s basement. And no, tape was never cheap, but radio quality conversion is way more expensive. No, plates were never cheap, but a rack of Bricasti’s is way more expensive and I can assure you that you need a rack of Bricasti’s.
          Then there’s the writer, and if you ever had the pleasure of working with one, you’ll know s/he’s way more expensive than ever, too. Not complaining, s/he’s worth every cent because s/he’s the ticket to charts, just stating the facts.
          Then we have distribution: I know you don’t like YouTube so I assume you don’t use it. But here’s another fact:
          It’s all about video today.
          Have you any idea what it costs to produce a video in the quality people demand?
          Your song didn’t happen if you don’t have that video.
          As for development: It’s d.e.a.d.

          Reply
          • GGG
            GGG

            First off, you’re conflating owning gear/a studio and just recording. They are completely different the vast majority of the time. You don’t have to buy a Gibson or Steinway or Neve to bring to the studio, the studio will have those, or whatever they have instead. I’m not arguing it’s expensive to open a studio, I’m arguing it’s not expensive to record, relatively, if you do some research. And I’m not saying you can make a good record for $1K, but it’s not the $50-100K+ endeavor of yore.
            And sure, if your goal is to be a shallow pop star and sing a slightly different version of a shitty song Miley Cyrus or Katy Perry released 4 months ago, then yes, hiring Bonnie McKee to write your song will be expensive. Or you could be talented and write your own songs with a little help, like Adele. Or Taylor Swift I guess.
            As for distribution, I’m sorry but if you think that’s expensive, especially comparative to anything past 10 years ago, you are clueless. I’m not against YouTube whatsoever, I just think it’s hilarious how you deride streaming so much but are 100% fine with YT’s worse payouts. Use CD Baby or Tunecore, you can put your music on the same platform every pop star does, with worldwide distribution for like $40-50. And/Or you can put it on Bandcamp for free. And/Or you can put it on youtube for free.
            As for making a video, friend of mine shot and animated a video that got selected for SXSW a couple years back for $0, just his time. A number of bands I’ve worked with have shot videos for a couple hundred bucks and video quality-wise they were up there with anything else. And if someone hired him to do that, not like he would have charged thousands of dollars. It’s about creativity. Unless you’re just some clueless person living under a rock (which do exist, certainly), quality is inherent and in 2013 not that hard to come by. You know how many rich film school kids are walking about with $1-2K cameras?
            And yes, development is dead because nobody has any balls anymore.

          • Visitor
            Visitor

            It is funny how somebody can say that it is way more expensive and then talking about hiring a writer!!!
            Yes if you want someone to baby sit you through all the music making and even write your music for you and why not hire some studio musicians etc etc yes then it is way more expensive but then again it would have been way more expensive twenty years ago to…
            If you write this kind of things my only assumption is thta there is not one creative bone in your body…
            By the way listening to a new album that was selfproduced and sounds real good right now.
            But I guess they would not sound good to you as they did not spend a lot of money and they actually worte their songs themselves?

          • Visitor
            Visitor

            “It is funny how somebody can say that it is way more expensive and then talking about hiring a writer”
            Well, that’s how it works.

          • GGG
            GGG

            Um…or people write songs themselves? Like a huge amount of people who have throughout history…?

          • Visitor
            Visitor

            “You don’t have to buy a Gibson or Steinway or Neve to bring to the studio, the studio will have those”
            Oh. And how, please tell us, is that studio going to get the next Gibsons, Steinies and Neves when there are no clients left because they’re looking for new jobs?
            “A number of bands I’ve worked with have shot videos for a couple hundred bucks and video quality-wise they were up there with anything else.”
            Come off it man, a couple hundred bucks won’t even buy you a lens for your camera.

          • GGG
            GGG

            Because people will always be making music. And there will always be enough people with enough money. And home gear will get even better and cheaper as time goes like literally all technology does. Not to mention people have made art since before it was remotely commoditized. This myth you people throw around that art will disappear is so ridiculously juvenile I get embarassed just responding to it.
            Please tell me you really aren’t this dense. Paying for gear and paying for a service are not the same thing. Not even sure why I need to clarify that for a second time. Are you like a shut in that doesn’t talk to other human beings? Walk into any city with an art school or people in their 20s and you can find countless people more than willing to do stuff for free or cheap. And if you meet enough and the right people they can be very talented.
            You live in this weird bubble where you think the only successful artists are like the top 10 most famous people in the world and that technology is still this $20K equipment only the top studios own. I hate playing the age card, but you’re very clearly old and out of touch. Open up a little bit or you’re going to live the rest of your days as the failed songwriter you currently are.

          • Visitor
            Visitor

            “or people write songs themselves?”
            That’s very rare today — at least when we’re talking about the stuff most people love (and you hate).
            It takes a huge team to create a hit in most cases.
            And here’s what pirates don’t get:
            Every single dude on that team has to be paid.
            Yup.
            Writers, lyricists, arrangers, musicians, studios, mixing & mastering engineers, video crews, they all have to be paid.
            If they’re not paid, they’re not working.
            And here’s the kicker: Nobody can pay them if the songs don’t sell.

          • GGG
            GGG

            You just really have to break out of your hit mentality. You don’t need a number 1 to make money in music. Your problem is you think success as a musician is being a millionaire. As for your obsession with songwriters, it’s not very rare at all to write your own stuff these days. Looking at the top 20 songs on Spotify right now, which correspond with mainstream top 40 depsite Yves’ insistance only music nerds use streaming, there’s only less than half are pure talking heads that definitely using songwriters. The rest are self-written, collabs, or artist+producer.

          • Visitor
            Visitor

            “people will always be making music”
            True!
            And if they make it in their spare time, it sounds like sh!t. You know it, I know it and the consumers know it.
            The 10k hour rule may not be apply in all cases, but it does take years and years of practise and/or education to become a good composer/lyricist/musician/arranger/recording-mixing-mastering engineer.

          • GGG
            GGG

            If you can’t record an good sounding album without breaking the bank in 2013 you are either
            1) extremely poor or otherwise disadvantaged, in which case nothing is different than any other time in history
            2) not popular enough to be making money off of music in the first place. I’m sorry there aren’t angel investors walking around giving every asshole with a guitar money to quit their dayjob and pursue their dream with Dr Luke and Rick Rubin producing every track.
            3) not good enough to have anyone give a shit about you, ie can’t crowdfund
            4) too stupid/lazy to do some basic research and make your budget work
            5) getting taken advantage of

        • Visitor
          Visitor

          “Piracy has allowed so many more crappy to great bands get noticed”
          Why don’t you let us know who these acts are?
          Just name the three greatest ones — plus documentation, of course.

          Reply
          • GGG
            GGG

            Grizzly Bear went on a media marathon talking about how nobody buys their music and how they make so little money. Yet they’re one of the more popular indies. http://www.vulture.com/2012/09/grizzly-bear-shields.html
            Couldn’t find a source in 2 minutes, but Macklemore has gone on record attributing a lot of his growth to piracy, along with a couple viral hits of course. Obviously now he’s sold a shitload of records, but plenty of people were stealing it now and before.
            Bit older, but this is from Robin Peckinold, lead singer of Fleet Foxes: “I’ve downloaded hundreds and hundreds of records – why would I care if somebody downloads ours? That’s such a petty thing to care about” Source: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/entertainment/8097324.stm

          • um
            um

            grizzly bear is a “good example” of benefitting/thriving thru piracy? as they state in the article, some of them can’t even afford health care. the main guy lives in a 450 sq. foot apartment w/his partner…. and “stuck somewhere between “scraping by” and “comfortable enough,” and unsure how they’d ever manage to do things like support families or pay for any children’s educations, “.

            macklemore is definitely a hit (tho not sure due to piracy rather than digital, as has been brought up.)
            i’m curious as to what will happen to Arcade Fire when they release their next one. they were huge just at the cusp, just before streaming / youtube /piracy …

          • GGG
            GGG

            In terms of popularity, yes, they are. And also, a 450 sq ft apt in NYC is gonna run about 2K a month. The other 99% of musicians in the world would love to be able to afford that purely on playing music. Also, my larger point is still that they wouldn’t be there if the only way to hear their music was to buy it. Or, I will concede that a few of these bands would probably get lucky and breakthrough regardless, but not nearly as many as can play 3-4-5K seat rooms.

          • Visitor
            Visitor

            GGG, I asked you to provide documentation for your ridiculous claim that ‘piracy has allowed […] many great bands to get noticed’.
            And what happens?
            You can’t even name one of them!
            Instead you mention two total failures — Grizzly Bear and Fleet Foxes — plus one lonely star that you think endorses piracy.
            Beyond pathetic, GGG.

          • GGG
            GGG

            Um…Grizzly Bear and Macklemore and Fleet Foxes aren’t noticed? I did exactly what you asked, moron. Go to a fucking indie act’s show and ask 100 people if they bought the CD. If you get more than 20 yes’s I’ll mail you a prize.

          • Visitor
            Visitor

            “Grizzly Bear and Macklemore and Fleet Foxes aren’t noticed?”
            Sorry, but Grizzly Bear and Fleet Foxes are nobodies by any reasonable standard, and your unsubstantiated Macklemore fantasies don’t count as documentation.

          • GGG
            GGG

            No, they are very much somebodies in the indie world which is what I’m talking about. You want to keep your standards with Katy Perry numbers, more power to you. Maybe you can take that bitterness and turn it into a shit power ballad.

          • GGG
            GGG

            Also, I never said he endorses piracy. Never said any of them endorse piracy. If they endorse it, it’s not really piracy now, is it? Big difference between endorsing something and being apathetic or dealing with it.

        • hippydog
          hippydog

          QUOTE “the indie music scene THRIVES because of piracy”
          I would agree that is some ways it is doing better, but NOT because of piracy.
          I would say (in my opinion) that the direct cause is more the ‘digital age’ then the Pirating itself. (IE: indie websites able to startup at a relative low cost, and allowing artists to easily add their music, the artists themselves able to start their own websites and directly access possible fans, etc etc)
          As to “thriving”, that subjective, depending on who you ask.. I dont have numbers at hand to prove one way or another, but I dont think “thriving” would be the correct term..

          Reply
          • GGG
            GGG

            I agree with you 100% the digital age has everything to do with it. I just think the reason people are able to listen to so much music is because it’s available so easily for nothing. This is also why I advocate streaming so much. This desire in the indie world to consume as much music as possible won’t go away any time soon.

        • Jens
          Jens

          I’m not sure, if I’m allowed to link to the interview – but if you read the preceding answer, it becomes a little clearer what he means:
          “Yngwie: Well first of all is very bizarre, especially for someone like me. When I started out, it was very much like the guy with the big cigar in a big office saying, “I’ll give you a record deal, boy”. You had tour support, tour busses, local A&R people, the whole nine yards, I did that but it’s all gone now. It can be for better or worse because if you don’t have name recognition now, if you want to start out now, how the fuck do you do it? Back in the day Def Leppard said if they could get a few singles on MTV they’d be able to make it, and they did. That happened with a lot of bands who did that back then. Now we have YouTube but there are billions of videos and musicians on there and if nobody knows your name, nobody’s going to look you up. It’s a little bit weird but in that sense the music industry situation is really bad for whoever wants to start out now. The good part is that there is no longer this slavery to a certain format going on, where in the 80’s if you didn’t follow format, they wouldn’t give you the time of day. You had to conform to get a shot at a record deal. That’s gone now and it’s bizarre.”

          Reply
          • GGG
            GGG

            I still don’t agree with him. It’s no harder/easier now to break through the clutter than it was to even be heard and then cared about by a major label A&R guy back then. It’s always been hard to be a musician. I’m much younger than Mr Malmsteen and wasn’t alive/old enough back then but I know enough to know that there wasn’t a high success rate of being signed, let alone financially successful for bands back then, either.
            The only difference that I see now is you probably have to do more work on the front end before people throw money at you. I see that as being a good thing just as much as a bad thing. I like to think it weeds out more shit than it kills legitimately talented musicians/bands.

        • Visitor
          Visitor

          ” It certainly hurts once you get past a certain level of notoriety, but it also makes going from regional popularity to national popularity infinitely easier.”

          Interestingly, the same can be said of terrorism.

          Reply
  4. Tune Hunter
    Tune Hunter

    It is not piracy that killed or choked the industry.
    Lack of creativity and total blindness to recognize and implement best resources for monetization of music we ever got is behind current deprssion. Shazm, Sounhound, Gracenote, lyric ID services, cyber simila tune suggest services are unharnessd, ignored by labels resources servicing pirating public in 9 out 10 cases.
    Vevo, Soofy and all internet radios will never bring music industry back to 40 biilions we seen in 1999.
    In the meantime if somone would decide to sale music ( just like apples on the local farm market) for just 39 cents a tune we will have 100 billion dollar business in less than 10 years.

    Reply
    • blahblahblah
      blahblahblah

      If I’m understanding correctly you think it would help to sell a song for, say, 39 cents vs. 99 cents? Problem is, too many people don’t want to pay for music AT ALL anymore. They don’t even want to own a digital file anymore. How the always short-sighted record labels thought it was a good idea to allow companies like Spotify to provide a service that offers millions of songs to be listened to for free as many times as one wants is beyond me. You can’t get people used to paying nothing. They won’t want to go back.

      Reply
      • tune Hunter
        tune Hunter

        Labels are only keeping the goods under temporary mismanagement.
        If we provide proper monetization avenues, musicians, the owners will stop free flow of music.
        We have crisp and clear 100 billion dollar music industry kept away from musicians and investors by few ignorantos!
        We need few bold (crazy) out of box moves to double the busines in few years – our best resources are either idling or serving the freeloaders at venture capital expense.

        Reply
  5. E-Rock
    E-Rock

    All this is BS – immature children whining about losing money they were never entitled to.
    This is the best thing that could happen to music – idiots and egomaniacs like Yngwie will drop out and those who love music – NOT those who only want to be rock stars – will stay.
    Guys like Yngwie don’t understand economics – if you can make unlimited copies of something for no cost then the value of the product MUST go down, and when you have an unlimited inventory pirating costs the musician NOTHING! They have found that people who pirate spend 3 TIMES as much on legitimate music than those who don’t. Sharing (what idiots like this call piracy) is the #1 way new music is discovered by fans.
    What this means is that artists need to make money from performances, not sitting in an ivory tower and dumping what you think is good music on the masses. Sorry, Yngwie, but conceded assholess like you are dead in the new industry because you are so arrogant and conceited that you cannot stomach having to ass-kiss the fans who pay for YOUR ENTIRE LIFE!!!

    Reply
    • hippydog
      hippydog

      Quote “They have found that people who pirate spend 3 TIMES as much on legitimate music than those who don’t.”
      Wow, people still believe that completely made up stat eh?
      The original study is here
      http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/market-data-research/other/telecoms-research/copyright-infringement-tracker/
      When you look at the actual report, They were comparing “infringers” who also purchase legal content (digital and non digital) to consumers who basically have never touched a ‘download’ button..
      The connect generation spends more on content then people who are not “connected”.
      that seems to be a more accurate description.. and more what the report actually said.
      Also the report is referring to ALL digital & physical copy..
      So the infringers who spend more money, may NOT be spending that extra money on music.. (IE: not having to spend money on music, they can afford to purchase the newest book, or game)

      Reply
    • YoungGun
      YoungGun

      It’s you who doesn’t understand, I’m sorry. This isn’t just about supply and demand. And it absolutely effects ALL musicians, everywhere and their ability to make any kind of career making music. This isn’t just about the Madonna’s and Metallica’s of the world whining about lost sales.

      When you steal intellectual property anonymously online, you’re missing one of the most important parts of the equation – you’re giving up the opportunity to vote with your dollars. If it’s worth enough for you to steal it but not for you to buy it, that’s confusing. It’s like a tree falling in the woods – no one knows why. Now multiply that my MILLIONS. Do you not like the record? The band? The entire genre? Do you like a competetor better?

      When you pirate a Daft Punk record for example, that’s not the same as streaming it from their website with an email subscription or buying a competetor’s album. If 200,000 people bought a Pharrell song, but didn’t buy Get Lucky, that would send a clear message – a lot of people like one thing and not another. Piracy flattens that and makes it much harder for musicians to provide a product that people want to pay for.

      Reply
  6. Lurker
    Lurker

    Yngwie should stick to his craptastic shredding skills. Move over old timer, this is the new era. Adapt or step off.

    Reply
  7. Jacko
    Jacko

    “Piracy killed the music industry” is a gross oversimplification and is one of the catalysts for sure, but not the root.

    Storage got larger
    Technology got cheaper
    Internet speeds got faster
    Anonymity on the Internet
    A complacent, technically ignorant recording industry
    The music industry is just as to blame. They failed to defend and inform themselves at the earliest sign of this massive shift. In the mid 90’s, no one in the recording industry had their ear to the ground with digital media. The music industry should have spent every last dime necessary to shepherd the new digital media age instead of try to play catch up once the Napsters and cheap MP3 players hit the public conscious.
    Along the way, people stopped placing value on music and now we’re seeing what human nature does – if they can’t see your face and they can find your music for free, no one gets hurt. Right? Along with a shrinking middle class (and evaporating household entertainment budgets), this is a perfect storm for piracy.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Verify Your Humanity *