Google Play Music Arrives On iOS…

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Google has dropped their music service into the App Store of their competitor.

This move pits Google Play directly against iTunes Radio, which is only available on one platform. However, iTunes Radio comes pre-installed on iOS devices.

Features of the Google Play Music app include:

  • Storage of up to 20,000 songs which can be streamed via iPad or iPhone
  • Paid streaming service Google Play All Access
  • Ad-free radio stations based on songs or artists
  • Curated and app-generated recommendations

Apple, your move.

 

 

8 Responses

  1. TuneHunter

    They are all dancing around music fan like a stripper in a sleazy joint!
    Why? What for? Let’s get normal well deserved cash for music without Soofy activities!
    Who is behind this nonsense?

    Reply
  2. Yves Villeneuve

    Most people only need storage for much less than 5000 songs. Most people aren’t fanatic pirates.

    The average music expenditure of iTunes music buyers is $4 per month. Unlikely to get Apple product fans to spend $10 per month on a competitors music service.

    Ad-free radio? Probably is part of the $10 per month music streaming subscription. Apple also has ad-free radio coupled with iMatch at $25 per year.

    iTunes has similar music recommendation services.

    Realistically, Google won’t have much stats to report with respect to the number of iOS users actively engaged in the Google music app. Apple does not need to make a counter move… It is already well positioned with its current offering of consumer products.

    If I were Apple, I would offer iTunes Radio as an android app. May be too hard otherwise to convert softcore android users to the iOS ecosystem. That said, I am open to healthy competition in the OS market.

    Reply
    • PiratesWinLOL

      “Most people only need storage for much less than 5000 songs. Most people aren’t fanatic pirates.”

      True, but still it is important to have a high limit. Most people don’t like the feeling of having a realistic limit imposed on them, especially when it comes to pirating stuff.

      “The average music expenditure of iTunes music buyers is $4 per month. Unlikely to get Apple product fans to spend $10 per month on a competitors music service.”

      They offer a lot more than iTunes. The freedom to listen to almost any piece of music ever recorded, should be worth the extra few dollars to a lot of people.

      Reply
      • Yves Villeneuve

        iCloud isn’t catering to pirates. I think most people can count how many songs are currently in their personal library and how many they expect to acquire in the future. They will find their needs are adequately served with iCloud.

        iMatch, a convenient library matching service with a 25000 songs limit at an annual fee of $25 per year, is intended to monetize previous piracy at the current SoundExchange rate of roughly 0.0025.

        Let’s face it, almost no one can love 5,000 – 25,000 songs in their lifetime. Consumers should only be storing songs they love or songs that belong to an album they love.

        The average music listener, most music listeners by any measure, whether an Apple iTunes or Google Play customer, is more than happy to listen to their private personal library of only music they love in addition to free radio of music they like and potentially love.

        Reply
        • Yves Villeneuve

          Correction: almost no one can love 10,000-25,000 songs during their lifetime. I concede most consumers will spend less than $100-$120 per year on music purchases, since the average iTunes music customer spending is $50 per year.

          Reply
          • TuneHunter

            iTunes is not a good reference to analyze spending patterns – they serve to few millions old CD traditionalists..
            Analytics for spending patterns are in front of us if we ever decide to sale music.

          • starpause

            DJs spend much more than $200 a year on content and are the ones likely to think 20,000 songs isn’t enough. They’re also the ones looking for advanced tagging and playlist features. Pioneer’s rekorDBox software does well to serve the high spending DJ crowd but doesn’t offer any cloud storage solution.

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