The 100 Most Pirated Music Releases…

 

piratebay100

43 Responses

      • Anonymous

        …oh, and just to make sure we’re on the same page: It’s also illegal to steal cars.

        Reply
        • Throckmorton Ploop

          Yes, of course it is…..reminds me of that anti-piracy ad from long ago. Went something like…..”You wouldn’t steal a car, would you?” It was a good one. Do you remember it?

          Reply
  1. Anonymous

    Imagine what would happen if Google were forced to stop its piracy support, like it was forced to stop its child porn support.

    The Pirate Bay would die in 48 hours.

    Reply
    • show me+the+money...

      “Imagine what would happen if Google were forced to stop its piracy support, like it was forced to stop its child porn support.The Pirate Bay would die in 48 hours.”

      Yup.

      Reply
    • david

      …. because people have no idea how to find TPB without using Google? Or because Google ads run on the site? Neither are true.

      Reply
    • Versus

      Exactly. Clearly, it is technologically possible, but the will is not there. Google simply makes too much money from this criminality.

      Reply
    • smg77

      So Google runs TPB now? Some of you need to figure out the difference between web sites and search engines.

      Reply
      • Anonymous

        If you link to a pirate site you are no different then a pirate..

        Reply
        • Anonymous

          “So Google runs TPB now? Some of you need to figure out the difference between web sites and search engines.”

          Here’s what criminals say when they try to justify The Pirate Bay:

          “TPB is no worse than Google — both are search engines.”

          And they’re right. Both are search engines, and both make a lot of money from violating the DMCA in a well-planned and systematic way.

          Reply
    • John R

      Google took down 23,096 Pirate Bay links from their search results just last week alone. It’s publicly available information:

      Reply
      • Anonymous

        An important part of Google’s business model is to maximize the revenue it generates from the interval between a and b, where a is the moment Google uploads the criminal material, and b is the moment when it is forced to take it down.

        This technique was developed and refined in order to monetize current flaws in the DMCA.

        Reply
          • Anonymous

            Hm, I just googled “the pirate bay” — and got 7,300,000 results.

            In the the top result, Google asks you to: “Download music, movies, games, software! The Pirate Bay”

            Below that statement, Google tells you that “The Pirate Bay is the galaxy’s most resilient BitTorrent site” and links directly to the criminal site.

          • Anonymous

            …..and below that statement is a news headline….

            The Pirate Bay doubles traffic despite ban

            Kinda funny.

  2. david

    It’s a little simplistic to say that the top 100 releases on TPB are the “most pirated”. This is just bittorrent and just one bittorrent site out of many – it’s not even the most popular BT site worldwide anymore. You’re missing locker services, mp3 download sites, VK, what’s going on outside the (mostly) English-language focus of TPB.

    If you’d headlined it “The 100 Most Pirated Music Releases on ThePirateBay” you’d be more accurate but then I guess it wouldn’t play so well….

    Reply
      • FarePlay

        Perhaps David would write a more accurate article. David’s right about one thing. People will always find a workaround, but not everyone’s as smart as David or as determined.

        Ending piracy is about getting people to understand why paying is worth it. Now, there’s an article David is clearly unqualified to write.

        Reply
        • Anonymous

          “Ending piracy is about getting people to understand why paying is worth it”

          …and make them understand what’s happening if they don’t pay (artists and labels can no longer afford to produce the kind of music people want).

          Reply
    • Anonymous

      Nah, they’re just thieves.

      Make them pay for what they steal.

      Reply
    • smg77

      I’m sure killing music fans will work just as well as suing them did.

      Reply
      • Anonymous

        Not sure what you mean — we’re not discussing music fans here.

        They just want their favorite musicians to keep making music. And the only way to make that happen is to pay for the songs.

        Producing music in the quality consumers (and criminals) want is extremely expensive.

        Reply
        • PiratesWinLOL

          Your fantasies about punishing pirates are childish 🙂 TPB, mp3skull, Groove Shark etc. will be here today, tomorrow and in 10 years. Sure, I would indeed like it the other way around too and see the music industry burn and die, considering the evil and oppression they have been behind. Their attacks on actual artists like Girl Talk, Danger Mouse and De La Soul says everything, just like their obscene behavior with regards to sites such as Reelradio. On the other hand, I know it is not going to happend, with streaming having saved them to some extend.

          Reply
          • Anonymous

            “TPB, mp3skull, Groove Shark etc. will be here today, tomorrow and in 10 years”

            Um, that’s what they said about MegaUpload. 🙂

          • PiratesWinLOL

            Yeah, sure, and it is still there just under the name “Mega”. Only difference is that they made it even better and much more private and secure, with strong end to end encryption being a possibility.

            https://mega.co.nz/

          • Paul Resnikoff
            Paul Resnikoff

            I have to go with Anonymous on this one. If MegaUpload had existed during the Napster days, they would have been sued by the music industry, and they may have survived. But now it’s Hollywood and television freaking out, which introduces a whole new armada into this war.

            Obama visits LA to get contributions from Hollywood; there just isn’t that much money left in the music industry anymore.

            Care to differ? Let’s take a look. Major labels are weak, their revenues are down 75% or more in the last ten years. Tech companies like Spotify and Apple definitely don’t care. Which brings us to touring, where giants like Live Nation doesn’t care about piracy and recording devaluation, because piracy makes more artists hit the road (David Lowery just wrote about this). They are loving this!

            But big Hollywood studios DO care about piracy, and are putting lots of pressure on politicians and law enforcements.

            Thing Dotcom’s mansion would have gotten raided 10 years ago? Exactly…

  3. Dan

    So bang goes the often heard argument from Pirate Scum that they only pirate music that isn’t available commercially anywhere.

    When are we going to start throwing these scumbags in jail?

    Reply
      • Dan

        If we had decent legislation we could – people being able to hid behind ‘safe harbour’ etc. means protecting our content and art is difficult.

        Reply
  4. Lemon

    This brought back memories. I’m surprised that anyone even takes the time anymore to download. Ain’t they heard of this new fangled thing called Spotify?

    Reply
  5. Tom

    I don’t understand why they don’t already use some download filter, which recognizes which songs are downloaded? Like the way Youtube recognizes a song in a video. It should be in the law that internet providers would need to recognize somehow the music downloads (songs), and they should charge the people who are downloading the songs with a small fee. (sorry for my bad english)

    Reply
    • Anonymous

      “I don’t understand why they don’t already use some download filter, which recognizes which songs are downloaded?”

      Technically, it would be very easy for Google to block well known criminal sites like the Pirate Bay permanently — YouTube’s Content ID and Google Search’s child porn politics prove that.

      But Google makes a lot of money from piracy, and the current law was written in another century and did not anticipate this kind of industrialized abuse.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Verify Your Humanity *