Thom Yorke’s BitTorrent Bundle Hits 1 Million Downloads…

york   The following is a statement issued by Matt Mason, chief content officer of BitTorrent, early this morning.  “[Last] Friday, Thom Yorke released an experiment: a new album called Tomorrow’s Modern Boxes; a new way of distributing music via BitTorrent Bundle.

“Today, that project has been downloaded more than 1 million times; including both free downloads of the single and video, and paid downloads of the full album.”



Yorke released the album with this stated goal:

“If it works well it could be an effective way of handing some control of Internet commerce back to the people who are creating the work.”

One million downloads later, it’s working. Thank you, all. If you haven’t yet purchased Tomorrow’s Modern Boxes, your copy is here.”

23 Responses

    • Anonymous

      Because we knew back then what we know now — that torrent users are too stupid to make money.

      Reply
    • INCLDUING FREE DOWNLOADS...

      No Kidding… LOL… Yeah… A million FREE downloads on BitTorrent… uhm, is that news? No, it is not.

      Reply
      • FarePlay

        One step forward, three steps back.

        Yes, by all means Thom, let’s introduce more people to Bit Torrent and lend them a sliver of legitimacy while we’re at it. Kind of like inviting Jeffrey Dahmer over to baby sit your kids.

        Reply
  1. Anonymous

    I am fairly sure others in the past have previously shown that people will download things for free.

    Reply
  2. adolf

    Thom Yorke who?

    ““If it works well it could be an effective way of handing some control of Internet commerce back to the people who are creating the work.”

    lol. he has no control anymore over the album. its a torrent!!!

    a new way of distributing music via BitTorrent Bundle

    what is “new” on this kind of distribution?

    Reply
    • smg77

      It would have become a torrent regardless of how it was released. At least this way he’s making money.

      Reply
  3. steveh

    This is unclear. Headline is wrong.

    We want to know how many paid downloads of the album itself. That is the statistic that matters.

    This figure should NOT be bundled in with free downloads of the single and video.

    Why do these digital people NEVER give out straight un-spun information?

    Reply
    • Anonymous

      “We want to know how many paid downloads of the album itself. That is the statistic that matters.”

      Indeed — this is just ‘whoopee, 10m retards stole my album on the pirate bay‘!

      Reply
      • GGG

        Yea, came here to say the same thing. Literally one dude could have bought the album and 999,999 downloaded the free single.

        Reply
    • Paul Resnikoff

      Just to clarify, the original title did say ‘Album’ and not ‘Bundle,’ though you could even argue the latter isn’t entirely accurate.

      Reply
      • steveh

        Hi Paul it’s very simple:-

        Did 1million people pay $6.00 and download the full album package?

        Or did just 1 person pay $6.00 to download the full album package and the other 999,999 downloaded the free items?

        Did they make $6.00 or $6,000,000? This is the only thing that we all want to know. And it looks like Thom Yorke’s corrupt fuckers don’t want to tell us.

        Shit isn’t it? Really shit.

        Reply
  4. john

    ok so i put my bands best of album on a free torrent bundle. one song was available without giving an email, whole album was available for just entering your email. of 1000 “downloads” only 10 percent entered the email to get the full thing. Granted Thom Yorke was directing his loyal fans to the site, but still this 1 million number is highly suspect.

    Reply
    • FarePlay

      John, what you just said confirms what I’ve been thinking about lately. An occurrence that flies in the face of current beliefs.

      You put your band’s best material out there and only 10% cared enough to give you an e-mail address to get the rest.

      The damage created by piracy is far worse than we have imagined and the Spotify model takes us further down that dark hole.

      The entire belief that free is/was a great strategy for getting heard and promoting a band simply doesn’t fly; people don’t value music because the marketplace is telling them that music has no value.

      I had this realization with the U2 free record. I’m a fan, I like their music, but there was no immediacy to listen to it. In fact I heard it for the first time a few days ago, even though I downloaded it the day it became available.

      I couldn’t figure it out for the life of me and then it just dawned on me. It’s like a kid who gets a brand new car for graduation and never takes care of it and before too long it is just a dirty, funky piece of metal. When it’s free you have no skin in the game. That’s why going to concerts and better yet festivals are what kids want. It’s more about the party than the music. It’s more about a cell phone picture than being locked on the music.

      Most of you commenters under thirty will not get this, it is your known. You grew up in a world of free and it doesn’t mean shit to you.

      Oh yes and before you real fans like GGG and JW fly into a rage, you are the tiny minority of your generation who are really into music, so rail all you want, but that’s reality.

      Reply
  5. Obie

    “…including both free downloads of the single and video, and paid downloads of the full album.”
    ——————————–

    Wow, that is some politician-worthy bullshit there, lumping those two things together into a single figure…

    Reply
    • Anonymous

      We don’t know if there are two things — there may not be any paid downloads.

      Reply
  6. Enrico Palazzo

    So, TimTomThomThumbellina discovered bit torrents last week, then?

    Isn’t he the same douche with the band that did an album called “OK Computer”? What the hell did he think was going on when he made that?

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Verify Your Humanity *