More Teens Listen to Spotify and Pandora Than FM Radio…

shareofear

It’s official: according to data just released by Edison Research, more American teenagers listen to Spotify, Pandora, and other streaming music services than traditional, FM broadcast radio.  The finding comes from Edison’s ‘Share of Ear’ report, which measures all forms of music listening, including downloads, streaming services, online radio, and traditional AM/FM broadcast channels.


Most major radio stations also simulcast their streams online, but according to Edison, that isn’t really helping.  Instead, web-born platforms are easily commanding greater share.  Edison also tallied time spent with Pandora and Spotify rivals like Beats Music, iTunes Radio, and Rhapsody, though those contributions are mostly marginal.  Indeed, Pandora and Spotify have emerged as the 800,000 lb. gorillas in the streaming space, and are now taking over a jungle once ruled by big, broadcast beasts (alongside stuff like CDs and downloads).

In total, Edison found that the average American teenager (between the ages of 13 and 17) listens to just over 4 hours of audio a day.  Overall, Edison polled more than 2,000 Americans aged 13 or older for the finding.

 

26 Responses

  1. Anonymous

    The funny thing is that broadcaster giants (Clear Channel, Cumulus, etc.) had the resources to create web services similar to Pandora and Spotify and be the the gorillas. They completely threw that away while they worked on consolidating and building empires of syndicated garbage. Only years later did they decide to create inferior services like iHeartRadio and invest in Rdio even though the playing field had already been decided.

    I feel sorry for the little broadcasters that are just trying to get by. But the big companies deserve their fate.

    Reply
    • GGG

      They also had the resources to not turn every station into the same rotation of bullshit, but failed. I can understand top 40 stations, as one could argue there aren’t really THAT many great songs out at time, but even classic rock stations play the same 30 staples over and over again, like there was only 30 classic songs written in the 60s and 70s….

      Reply
  2. David Rosen

    The only reason this surprises me is because I listen to more Spotify than FM radio and I’m an old fart and don’t get anything that kids do nowadays. Damn kids.

    Reply
  3. RIAA10

    2014 first 6 months—- download: $1.3 billion (down 12%)
    2014 first 6 months —-streaming: $859 mil (up 28%)
    2014 first 6 months —- physical: $898 (down 14%)

    source: RIAA

    2014 full year prediction —-download: $2.444 billion (down 12%)
    2014 full year prediction —-streaming: $1.959 billion (up 28%)
    2014 full year prediction —-physical $1.670 billion (down 14%)

    2015 prediction: STREAMING WILL BE KING

    #1 Streaming: $2.5 billion (up 28%)
    #2 Download: $2.1 billion (down 12%)
    #3 Physical: $1.5 billion (down 14%)

    Reply
  4. so

    Excellent news. Listeners calling the shots on what they want to hear. For those artists with absolutely no chance at FM radio, a chance to be stumbled upon, heard, and paid.

    Reply
  5. Anonymous

    America Population = 330+ Million

    Edison Poll = 2000 people aged 13+

    Edison Study based on = people age 13-17

    Reasonable conclusion = Priceless…

    Reply
    • There is something...

      Research institutes always conduct polls on a limited amount of people, but those people are carefully selected to represent the targeted demographics. Of course, there is always an error margin, but most of the time it’s accurate enough to understand how tendencies are evolving. And the result here is not surprising at all.

      Reply
      • Anonymous

        It’s not enough of a poll to come to any conclusion here…

        If that is how research companies always operate, then i would kindly suggest it might be time to start changing that… It’s likely been a corporate sponsored study area for too long where a small poll is all that is needed, it may be time to start fixing that gnarly nail…

        It isn’t like people are fish, and while we often do joke and use the term as a metaphorical representation of people, we can’t just go to a lake and scoop out one small hand net of trout, metaphorically, and make any sort of correlation beyond very simple things… While yes, migratory patterns are often easily noticed through small polls or studies, the reality is we are a slightly more advanced species and while the masses do tend to still show those migratory attitudes and habits, we live in a much more automaton society with many choices, a lot of information, and overall a better educated and aware people and we are a vastly more complex species which makes these sorts of things harder to perceive and study with small numbers…

        It’s more likely they have a bunch of data suggesting as such and use the poll as a means to not uncover their data or algorithms etc.

        I’m not slamming the research company, as more typical old school jobs fade things like r&d will only become more and more important… They probably need more investment or money, as do most people, it’s hard to do things right without the budget needed and that’s more often the reason such a small pool is chosen and not because of the hypey marketing drivel spewed forth…

        In a country of 330 Million and a planet of 7 ought Billion, i don’t think a poll of 2000 people is enough to figure out any tendencies…

        I think so long as Radio doesn’t forget some of, or all of, its main appeal is the local aspect, it will survive just fine for quite some time to come… A smaller locally owned business will more often get better results from playing a local radio station as opposed to just a global playlist…

        Reply
        • thedude

          it’s called statistics moron…a proven mathematical science.

          If you wanted to conduct a survey of the 330 million US population and get an answer that has a 99% confidence level and +/- 3% margin of error you’d only need to sample 1,849 people.

          Calculated as:

          Sample Size Needed = [(z^2 * p(1-p)/e^2)] / [1 + (z^2 * p(1-p)/e^2*N)
          where N = Population size, e = margin of error and z = number of standard deviations a given proportion is away from the mean (at a 99% confidence level you’d used a z-score of 2.58)

          Reply
          • thedude

            to caveat it…a poll of 2,000 should be enough to get great results for the general population. If they wanted to get the 13-17 age group conclusion accurately they should have polled 2,000 13-17.

          • Anonymous

            it’s called statistics moron…a proven mathematical science.

            If you wanted to conduct a survey of the 330 million US population and get an answer that has a 99% confidence level and +/- 3% margin of error you’d only need to sample 1,849 people.

            Calculated as:

            Sample Size Needed = [(z^2 * p(1-p)/e^2)] / [1 + (z^2 * p(1-p)/e^2*N)
            where N = Population size, e = margin of error and z = number of standard deviations a given proportion is away from the mean (at a 99% confidence level you’d used a z-score of 2.58)


            Hey thedude,

            Greetings and Salutations 🙂

            Thanks for the reply, much appreciated…

            Moron? Well i’m sure sometimes i might come off as one and most definitely there are times in my life where i have been one, so thanks for the kind heart felt words of support and honesty, as you are certainly correct, i’m just a moron, but i’m working on it, every day is another day to learn something and be better, and im doing my best, i do apologize sincerely if my best is not good enough as alas, it is my best… 🙂

            As the formula and textbook says, as do the people go… You are correct thedude, as per the formula as man knows it right now…

            I was saying something different, but never the less, me just simple man, me hit stick on stone and make noise, me scratch head and pat belly while grunting, me just uneducated man me know not nothing, ooh dog with fluffy tail hehehehe…

          • Cjhoffmn

            Only if you have a normal distribution and haven’t selected a sample with any bias which you don’t know until you examine the residuals. 2000 selected teenagers from urban cities will lead to a vastly different result than those selected from urban areas or from inner city vs larger areas like LA.
            Sampling a larger number of kids below driving age vs above driving age will also skew this data (and leave a large residual (which you forgot to mention) because more radio is consumed by those spending time in a car driving.

            None of which we know about here. This isn’t a terribly helpful conclusion because we don’t know about the sample.

            Math is important, it knowing how it actually applies is more important.

          • Cjhoffmn

            Only if you have a normal distribution and haven’t selected a sample with any bias which you don’t know until you examine the residuals. 2000 selected teenagers from urban cities will lead to a vastly different result than those selected from urban areas or from inner city vs larger areas like LA.
            Sampling a larger number of kids below driving age vs above driving age will also skew this data (and leave a large residual (which you forgot to mention) because more radio is consumed by those spending time in a car driving.

            None of which we know about here. This isn’t a terribly helpful conclusion because we don’t know about the sample.

            Math is important, but knowing how it actually applies is more important.

  6. Versus

    Normal radio deserves to die since it gets away without paying artists and labels.

    Reply
  7. Dan

    Problem is most Radio in the US is terrible anyway so you are not matching like for like

    Reply
  8. anon

    And where are most radios found? In cars perhaps. Most teens don’t drive and probably don’t have control of the dial when being driven.

    Reply
      • Anonymous

        they are getting into sectional entertainment controlling… they already have the visuals down where what one sees in the passenger seat is different then what one sees in the drivers seat… lets see if they are able to get audio into compartments, not sure its achievable at this moment but who knows whats possible, where each seat can listen to their own music yet still are able to talk to each-other, that would be nuts…

        the ghost protocol cars are coming, well they are already here but are coming on a more mass consumer scale, and when you take to the roads with all the crazy drivers out there, can’t come soon enough really…

        man those tesla roadsters are a real slick looking unit, shame its so brow beaten in the mainstream, that’s one car that tempts me to want such a depreciating asset, but for now i’m happy rolling in the 94 olds…

        Reply
  9. dudeNOdude

    Highly suspect that teens are listening to PANDORA, as most of what they stream is so like for older and passive listeners.

    Reply
  10. jw

    I wonder how the questions were worded… I wonder how much of the terrestrial listening happens in an environment where they would prefer to be listening to Pandora or Spotify.

    When radio was king, I always had a radio around… radio on my walkman, radio on my discman, radio on my bedroom stereo, radio on my boombox. I just set up a stereo last night & didn’t even bother connecting the FM antenna. Outside of my car, my old Realistic receiver may have an antenna… I’m not even sure. If you asked me to turn on a radio station at my house, I’m not confident I could even do it without using the internet.

    Although, I really like that the downfall means sports talk radio is becoming more prominent, & classic hip hop & classic country stations are popping up in major markets. Not enough to actually tune into them, but in theory it’s great.

    Reply
    • jw

      Hey anyone remember when the NAB tried lobbying for mandatory fm antennas on all cell phones? lolol

      That was a good strategy. Not.

      Reply
  11. NA

    Funny.. the people who are complaining this sample is “too small” to be accurate are the same ones who believe PPM portrays accurate radio listening….

    Reply

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