Aurous, the ‘Popcorn Time for Music,’ Settles Lawsuit for $3 Million

Aurous, the Popcorn Time for Music

Aurous, once dubbed the ‘Popcorn Time for Music,’ will never see the light of day.  According to legal filings with the US District Court for the Southern District of Florida, where legal proceedings against Aurous initiated, a $3 million settlement has now been reached.  As part of the expensive terms, Aurous will never be released, ever.

The settlement clearly establishes two things: (a) Aurous was responsible for massive copyright infringement, and (b) the application will never be launched or further developed.  Additionally, the aurous.com url will be transferred to the litigating Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), which mirrors terms secured from previous defeated parties like Grooveshark.

Judgment shall be, and hereby is, entered in favor of Plaintiffs and against the Aurous Parties on all of Plaintiff’s claims, and damages shall be awarded to Plaintiffs, and against the Aurous Parties, jointly and severally, in the amount of $US3,000,000, inclusive of all costs, attorneys’ fees and pre-judgment interest.  The Aurous Parties acknowledge and agree that this award of damages bears a reasonable relationship to the range of damages and attorneys’ fees and full costs that the parties could have anticipated would be awarded at and following a trial of this action.

(Filed consent judgment.) 

Cary Sherman, the handsomely-overpaid head of the RIAA, held the severed head in the air.  “Aurous appropriately agreed to shut down,” Sherman stated.  “It was the right thing to do. We hope this sends a strong signal that unlicensed services cannot expect to build unlawful businesses on the backs of music creators.”

The Aurous shutdown reflects a far more aggressive shutdown stance for the RIAA, a group that waited years before clamping down on Grooveshark.  That case was defended for years by New York-based firm Rosenberg & Giger, before Grooveshark was brutally defeated and essentially wiped from existence.  Just weeks after a court-ordered shutdown and surrender of its intellectual property and assets, Grooveshark cofounder Josh Greenberg was suspiciously found dead in his apartment (toxicology reports remain forthcoming).

 

More as this develops.  Send tips to [email protected], or (310) 928-1498 (complete confidentiality assured).

10 Responses

  1. Anonymous

    Nothing like telling some dummy to stop something or it will cost him millions, only for him to double down on his stupidity and plow ahead. Darwin strikes again.

    Reply
    • Anonymous

      He was such a smug prick throughout the process too.

      It’s hard not to enjoy seeing this pan out the way it did.

      Reply
    • Rick Shaw - The Illiterate

      LOL, indeed.

      True that a settlement itself is not an admission of guilt.

      It is, however, if it includes language like this (from the article you’re commenting on):

      “Judgment shall be, and hereby is, entered in favor of Plaintiffs and against the Aurous Parties on all of Plaintiff’s claims, and damages shall be awarded to Plaintiffs, and against the Aurous Parties, jointly and severally, in the amount of $US3,000,000, inclusive of all costs, attorneys’ fees and pre-judgment interest. The Aurous Parties acknowledge and agree that this award of damages bears a reasonable relationship to the range of damages and attorneys’ fees and full costs that the parties could have anticipated would be awarded at and following a trial of this action.

      That’s a judgment, that Aurous consented to.

      Reply
  2. steven corn

    So who gets the $3mil? Or the money left over after the legal fees are paid?

    Reply
  3. Anonymous

    “Cary Sherman, the handsomely-overpaid head of the RIAA, held the severed head in the air. “Aurous appropriately agreed to shut down,” Sherman stated. “It was the right thing to do. We hope this sends a strong signal that unlicensed services cannot expect to build unlawful businesses on the backs of music creators.””

    He’s right though, overpaid or not.

    Reply
  4. rikki

    should have stayed a rap hip hop underground site…black people never get sued by the RIAA.

    Reply
    • Universal Indie Records

      Why do you feel the need to constantly post this brand of idiocy every damn post? Someone definitely has you butt hurt.

      Reply
  5. Anonymous

    The 3M is the court’s judgment against Aurous but money will never change hands. As part of the settlement, Aurous, the company, must agree to dissolve and liquidate its assets to pay the judgment. The truth, however, is that the Aurous’ only assets were its infringing code ($0 value) and its domain. They handed the domain over to the RIAA. The little prick who set up the service skates away. Game over.

    Reply

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