Pandora Signs Multi-Year Deal with SONGS Music Publishing

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SONGS Music Publishing , the sixth biggest publishing company in the US, has struck a direct licensing deal with Pandora.

Pandora describes the multi-year, direct-licensing agreement as ‘creating business benefits.’  Such benefits are likely to give Pandora the ability to launch an more interactive streaming service in 2016, due to recently bought Rdio assets.  The news comes a month after the world’s largest publisher Sony/ATV announced a direct deal with Pandora, and represents a broader initiative to sidestep complicated government royalty rates with direct deals.

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// ]]>Direct-licensing is tricky stuff, and controversial.  But SONGS sees benefits.  “Now is the time to move past the over-regulation of songwriter rights and towards a market-based approach to streaming music,” said Matt Pincus, SONGS founder and CEO.  “I value Pandora‘s commitment to treating all songwriters and publishers equally and look forward to a new chapter with them.”

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// ]]>Brian McAndrews, chief executive officer of Pandora, added, “This agreement with SONGS underscores that commitment and demonstrates our shared belief that all publishers and songwriters should receive equal treatment.  Pandora is a leader in the space and we continue to improve value to music publishers and songwriters – a positive step for the entire industry.”

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The public performance royalties Pandora also pays to rights holders of master recordings are not affected by this agreement.

5 Responses

  1. Musicservices4less

    Here’s the BS about this news.

    One of the big “complaints” of the new generation of artists and songwriters is the lack of transparency both on the individual level and major company deal level. If SONGS Music Publishing, the sixth biggest publishing company in the US, and Pandora are so pro writer, artist, whatever, why don’t they publish the deal points of this arrangement including all payments, royalties, etc.? Why do they have in their agreement a confidentiality clause? What are they afraid of? What are they hiding?

    I’m calling them both out on this. Think they care? Let’s see.

    Reply
    • Anonymous

      they will be transparent with their signed writers, which are the only parties they are accountable to. This deal would not have been done without their buy-in, you can bet on that, and it is in every conceivable way going to mean more money for them.

      Reply
      • Musicservices4less

        I am attempting to start a discussion about a bigger issue regarding transparency. And that doesn’t mean giving a writer a more detailed accounting statement. It’s about what is really happening in these large scale deals that the companies that control the music industry make. When you get that big, you should have a responsibility to the industry to reveal the general basis on which these new deals are being structured. Better known as the basic deal points. Not the exact numbers. Items such as equity, large advances, options for equity, etc. should be revealed in a general way. Enough with the BS silicon valley venture capital behind closed doors crap. And it’s not always about the money. And I have no idea what you mean by the deal would not have been done by their writers buy in.
        In case you didn’t know, the structure of these large deals affects us all who live and work in this business of music.
        BTW, are you just a driveby or are you actually doing PR for Songs and/or Pandora?

        Reply
  2. Dumb

    ““Now is the time to move past the over-regulation of songwriter rights and towards a market-based approach to streaming music,” said Matt Pincus, SONGS founder and CEO.”

    But, they both go on to describe the OPPOSITE of a “market-based approach.”

    “Said Matt Pincus, SONGS founder and CEO: I value Pandora‘s commitment to treating all songwriters and publishers equally and look forward to a new chapter with them.”

    Brian McAndrews, chief executive officer of Pandora, added, “This agreement with SONGS underscores that commitment and demonstrates our shared belief that all publishers and songwriters should receive equal treatment.

    Treating every market participant equally means, by definition, NO COMPETITION.

    Reply

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