The Beatles: Now Available on Spotify, Apple Music, Tidal, Google Play, Amazon Prime…

The Beatles Start Streaming

The Beatles may have been a pioneering rock group in the 1960s, but they’re technological laggards in the 2010s.   Accordingly, surviving members of the group have just announced that the Beatles catalog will be available across a long list of streaming platforms.

One thing this band hasn’t lost over the decades is timing.  In a perfectly-timed splash, the streaming Beatles catalog will go live across a number of services on Christmas Eve.  Here’s the list of participating streaming services:

  • Spotify
  • Apple Music
  • Slacker
  • Tidal
  • Microsoft’s Groove
  • Rhapsody
  • Deezer
  • Google Play
  • Amazon Prime
  • Napster

The Beatles on Deezer

Already, many of these services are blasting out the news, but without an exclusive, it’s tough to get an edge.  Overall, however, the catalog addition is likely to create a streaming surge for the holidays, with families gathering around to listen to a few Beatles classics.

Others could use the catalog to catch up on branding (or, lack thereof). Indeed, ‘Microsoft Groove’ means nothing to the music-listening population, and services like Slacker remain buried in the branding awareness pile.  Others, including Amazon Prime and Google Play, have always had the marketing capital, but never the capability to serious dent front-runners Spotify and Apple Music.

Then, there’s the matter of who’s missing.  Soundcloud is one standout, even though a considerable amount of Beatles catalog is available on the service (illegally, of course).  YouTube is another glaringly-absent name, especially given its recently-launched, YouTube Red premium service.  But again, giant chunks of the Beatles catalog can be found on YouTube, a serious problem for those on the list above.

From a strictly business standpoint, perhaps this timing makes perfect sense.  2015 was the year that streaming overtook downloads, with the latter format continuing its decline.  In turn, that decline could turn towards a nosedive, thanks to a massive push by Apple away from iTunes a-la-carte downloading.  That might be disastrous for a number of labels and artists, particularly those whose revenue is heavily reliant on recordings.

 

17 Responses

  1. Name2

    In turn, that decline could turn towards a nosedive, thanks to a massive push by Apple away from iTunes a-la-carte downloading. That might be disastrous for a number of labels and artists, particularly those whose revenue is heavily reliant on recordings.

    7digital and Pono offer lossless and/or Hi-res a-la-carte downloading of individual tracks from most albums.

    When allowed by labels.

    Again, when allowed by labels. So, you will typically still find it impossible to download individual songs from most soundtrack albums.

    Because the labels won’t let go of what worked 50 years ago.

    It has nothing to do with Apple’s “massive push” of anything.

    Reply
    • Paul Resnikoff
      Paul Resnikoff

      Song downloads started declining because the market moved toward streaming. And most downloads were happening on iTunes.

      Apple, behind the curve, has now decided to give streaming a massive level of emphasis, which means forcefully moving consumers away from downloads.

      So, the largest outlet for song downloads, is pushing consumers towards streaming. That’s why an already-declining format will drop even further.

      Reply
      • Name2

        Song downloads started declining because the market moved toward streaming.

        And full album download sales remained stable. Your point?

        Apple, behind the curve, has now decided to give streaming a massive level of emphasis, which means forcefully moving consumers away from downloads.

        Single-song downloads are tanking. Yeah, streaming’s probably a factor. I’ll give you that. I don’t know why Apple would swim against that tide and not capture that market shift. Why shouldn’t they?

        But back to your claims.. how can Apple simultaneously be “behind the curve”, and the “massive push” that kills single-song downloads?

        Reply
        • Paul Resnikoff
          Paul Resnikoff

          And full album download sales remained stable. Your point?

          Full album downloads have never been a driver, they’ve always been a smaller percentage of paid download sales. Some people still think in terms of downloads, typically older consumers but that’s over-simplifying. The album isn’t ‘dead’ as many state, but it definitely isn’t the dominant format it was 20 years ago. It’s a way to collect songs, if you want.

          Single-song downloads are tanking. Yeah, streaming’s probably a factor. I’ll give you that. I don’t know why Apple would swim against that tide and not capture that market shift. Why shouldn’t they?

          Agreed. I’m not questioning why Apple would do this, just noting that they are. And that is having a big impact on the digital music market.

          But back to your claims.. how can Apple simultaneously be “behind the curve”, and the “massive push” that kills single-song downloads?

          Easy. They are behind streaming, they’re playing catch-up to Spotify and YouTube, which have years and years of a head start (add Soundcloud, Pandora, other giants to that list). Now, they are catching up, in a massive way, and massively pushing their massive customer base towards streaming.

          Even Grandpa Ernie can make a massive push way from his 8-track collection. He’s behind, sure, but he’s also making a push. There you go.

          Reply
  2. superduper

    I don’t care whether or not the Beatles stream: streaming is a bubble. Blaming the record labels are a cop-out because the fact remains that streaming is a TERRIBLE business model. Everybody likes to say that streaming is the future because it is becoming more popular now, but how accurate are predictions of the ‘future’ are really? Remember when iPods and digital downloads were the future of the music industry? Well I guess it’s not true anymore. Maybe in the future, we will be talking about streaming the same way as digital downloads ten years ago. Maybe we will be saying “remember when streaming was supposed to be the future?” Because so far it doesn’t look like it.

    Reply
    • Alan

      Right. Cause we’ll move back to cassettes and vinyl?

      Streaming, ie the delivery mechanism, is here to stay. Not just for music but all tv, music, movies will be streamed since it’s WAY more convenient and cheaper then buying, storing, playing content.

      Whether the current streaming companies or services are the ones to deliver that in 10 years time is another matter.

      Reply
      • Anon

        Streaming is not more convenient, at least for me- I have no wish to be tied to an internet connect to get my music. And if people were to add up all they pay to their ISP and cell provider, I doubt it’s really even that cheap.

        Reply
        • Name2

          All of the major streaming services (IDEK about Apple) let you save for offline listening.

          If you want to chew through your mobile data plan to hear Taylor Swift, or your ISP charges once you go over cap, that’s your problem. Shop moar better.

          Reply
          • Anon

            Which makes it not streaming at all, just a low quality download, that you don’t have to pay the artist for.

          • Name2

            1. Tidal offers a lossless offline option.
            2. I don’t know about you but I sure have to pay. If I don’t pay, I don’t get music.
            3. These services I pay in turn pay billions to copyright cartels.

            What are you saying? That that money’s disappearing in transit???

            Strange. Very strange. I don’t understand..

          • superduper

            That’s what I’ve been saying all along; the difference between streaming and downloading is the business model that it employs.

          • Name2

            Streaming and downloading are two very different experiences … to the customer. You remember the customer, right?

            Nobody cares about your accounting problems. Put your big boy pants on and solve your problems, already.

          • superduper

            What problems do I need to solve? LOL I know you don’t care about “my accounting problems” but when the whole systems comes crashing down, maybe then you will care.

  3. Name2

    The Beatles finally made their streaming music debut on Christmas Eve, and Spotify is sharing stats from the first 2 days. The Beatles songs have been added to over 673k playlists in two days and 65% of The Beatles listeners on Spotify are under the age of 34.

    LOLz. 65% weren’t even born when John was killed.

    Remi!! “Music discovery”!!!

    Reply

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