Spotify and Facebook Want to Totally Reinvent Music Discovery

Spotify's Marriage to Facebook Intensifies

Spotify has been busy working on ways to improve music discovery for listeners and artists.  Just yesterday, they launched their ‘Fresh Finds‘ playlist alongside five other genre-specific playlists that are updated on a weekly basis.  Prior to yesterday’s launch, Spotify also released ‘Discover Weekly‘, which generates a personalized playlist which is also updated weekly.

But Spotify hasn’t stopped there.  The company has now joined forces with Facebook to make it immensely easier to share and listen to their favorite songs, specifically through Facebook Messenger.

How does this work?

In Facebook’s messenger, there is a ‘more’ feature with a variety of app options, and within these options is Spotify.  By clicking on the app, users can search and share songs with their friends.  After the recipient receives the shared song, it’s off to Spotify to listen.

The new feature is great for music enthusiasts, as it not only allows users to share songs throughout a discussion, but it also boosts music discovery and social engagement.  Suddenly, Spotify and Facebook users can engage in lengthly and detailed conversations about music.

The integration also brings about benefits for both companies, as it gives Facebook users a reason to subscribe to Spotify, while enabling Spotify to tap into Facebook’s billion-plus active users.

That said, there appear to be some issues with actually playing the music once the song has been shared.  But given the fresh paint on this one, the bugs are likely short-lived problems that Spotify and Facebook will hopefully iron out.

 

(Photo Creative Commons, Attribution 2.0 Generic, cc by 2.0)

5 Responses

  1. Remi Swierczek

    Spotify must figure out how to provide remote orgasm with every tune they stream!
    At that point the World will subscribe and Daniel Ek will see his $10B IPO.

    Reply
  2. Nicky Knight

    Some of those companies I don’t trust, they’re not about the artist or even really about the music biz, they’re there to make millions/billions through IPO’s and what not..

    The trouble is that the music biz is no longer run by what used to be known as “record men/women” people who had the recorded music business in their DNA. Now it’s all about funny money, IPO’s and tech startups…

    Reply
    • FarePlay

      So true. The absence of understanding is terrifying. I went into Best Buy yesterday, only to find an even more barren and unattended CD section.

      It felt like death. A premature death where music streaming in their nearly decade long “free” music promotion coupled with out-of-control piracy and Amazon Tractor Trailers emblazoned with “Free” music rolling down the highways have effectively downgraded music to the loss leader for everything and anything else.

      This lack of understanding from someone who only knows the ‘new’ tech-music business is perfectly exemplified by the author of this post.

      Do some research, look at the financials of the business and put the pom, poms down.

      Reply
  3. FarePlay

    “The integration also brings about benefits for both companies, as it gives Facebook users a reason to subscribe to Spotify, while enabling Spotify to tap into Facebook’s billion-plus active users.”

    Thank-you for making my point. You get it now? You’re a tech person writing about the music business. These two companies are building their businesses on the backs of artists. And crushing them.

    Reply

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