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Europeans Have No Idea What a ‘Pandora’ Is…

pandorabelgium

We can debate the impact of iTunes Radio on Pandora, but that’s an American discussion.  Or, more correctly, a United States discussion.  Because in Europe, there isn’t a question at all: Europeans largely have no idea what Pandora is, and they’re not waiting for it.  And the same is true for Asians, Africans, and South Americans.

This all became glaringly obvious during a presentation at the Glimps Festival in Ghent, Belgium, where no one knew what the hell I was talking about.  Subsequent discussions with some Brits – all of whom were music fans – revealed a scant memory, from years ago (Pandora pulled out of the UK based on licensing costs).

Apple, meanwhile, has aggressive European rollout plans that begin next year.

All of which raises the question: instead of cashing out millions every month, shouldn’t Pandora executives put some of that money back into licensing?  For the US, and beyond?

Written while listening to Health, streamed on Rdio, in Brussels.

 

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Comments (21)
  1. Anonymous

    Better idea: Apply the European licensing constraints to the US. Problem solved.


    Reply
  2. Yves Villeneuve

    Pandora says they have 72mm active users.

    The truth is only 21mm are American users. The rest of the world are using proxies to mask true IPs.

    I don’t know who were in the audience for your presentation but they are not likely to be dedicated Internet radio users whether Pandora or Spotify Radio, for instance.


    Reply
    1. Anonymous

      There is no legitimate way to prove this.


      Reply
      1. Anonymous

        No kidding… The whole rest of the world…


        Reply
  3. Casey

    Why would executives use their own personal money to pay for company licensing?


    Reply
    1. Paul Resnikoff

      Well, they didn’t have to take out the money in the first place! Tim Westergren doesn’t need to liquidate $15 million year, as fast as his divestiture schedule allows.

      You can leave it in the company, cash-outs probably add up to at least $100 mm, if not a multiple.

      Gee I wonder what that money could be used for?


      Reply
  4. TuneHunter

    Lets convert all Radio including Pandora to plain digital music stores.
    Limit the radio display to just artist name or station name and allow Shazam to be RIDICULOUSLY OVERPAID cash register of the industry! @ just $.39 per tune we will double to 32 billions in three years.

    Labels, if you can not force legally Shazam, Echo Nest similar tune engine or lyrics ID guys just BRIBE THEM in to sanity.
    This will stop piracy and bring cash to all confused discovery boys and the industry.
    I still believe that RIAA’s and personal connections of mega stars can lobby new “fair use doctrine”

    IT IS NOT fair for Shazam and friends to keep in the system 30 million pieces of someones PRIVATE PROPERTY and process it extensively for the benefit of freeloaders and few advertising dollars!

    In 13 years they never made enough to cover operating expenses. Always in red looking for next investor.

    Well labels never noticed them and Mr. Jobs has put them on the street – music prostitution goes on.


    Reply
    1. TuneHunter

      Pandora doesn’t need Shazam to be a music store today.
      However it will not work as long as we have PIMP Shazam servicing freeloading public instead of terrestrial or XM Radio and forced to purchase listeners.
      Today Pandora user will be taken to You Tube / VEEVOO brothel for repeated pleasure and/or total ownership.


      Reply
  5. Chris

    Yes that’s right Pandora – we don’t like you in Europe because we make you actually PAY something to rights holders. The question of this article is “Why are Americans allowing Pandora?”


    Reply
    1. TuneHunter

      Pandora, XM or any Radio should not pay anything to anybody!

      They are the best providers (can become superb!) of discovery and today technology can convert them to best digital music retailers ever.
      Radio with instant one click shopping is a DREAM COME TRUE.
      We do have 100 billions of music around us and just ten slipping executors have to meet so they can be educated. We will close current bazaar and open real market.
      Optimistic news is that all current players, including Spoofy can and will blossom!
      Let’s do it.


      Reply
      1. Chris

        They all make a bundle of cash from music so they of course should pay the people that actually make it


        Reply
        1. TuneHunter

          If they become music stores you will get 10 to 20 times more cash than today.
          Current technology allows for such a great and good for all arrangement!

          Nobody asks Walmart for royalty on toilet paper or sophisticated razor blade – all participants of toilet paper trade are NORMAL for profit entities. Music should be no different.


          Reply
          1. Chris

            “If they become music stores you will get 10 to 20 times more cash than today. Current technology allows for such a great and good for all arrangement!”

            That’s a BIG “IF” – Pandora works on a blanket license (although I’ve just read in Billboard that this may be changing) and uses your music whether you like it or not. Blanket licenses work in Europe for ‘not for profit’ (e.g. the BBC in the UK) but they sure as hell do not work when the Pandora execs are making MILLIONS and paying the producers / artists / labels / rights holders a pittance and then even trying to reduce that.

            THAT is why they will never be allowed outside of the US.

            But I do agree if all stations were a one click purchase that would be a great idea but I don’t see what that has to do with Pandora?


            Reply
  6. Why do I bother?

    This is hilarious.

    A better headline would be: SHOCKED RESNIKOFF DISCOVERS WORLD OUTSIDE OF U.S. EXISTS.


    Reply
    1. Paul Resnikoff

      That was in the running, actually.


      Reply
  7. FarePlay

    i think everyone’s missing the larger discussion. Why isn’t Pandora available outside the US?

    It couldn’t have anything to do with licensing agreements, could it?

    Paul?


    Reply
    1. Paul Resnikoff

      Right, it has everything to do with them. ie, the cost of goods. Some questions:

      why isn’t more capital being allocated to pay for this?
      why isn’t Pandora figuring out an ex-US strategy?
      why is iTunes Radio waltzing into these markets without any competition from Pandora?
      why are executives cashing out as quickly as they can, instead of reinvesting Wall Street investment capital in licensing (as stated, the cost of doing business)?


      Reply
  8. X-Spotify

    Off on a tangent here but I am not very happy with Spotify. While I was working on my router I noticed that Spotify opened several ports via UPnP without any notification to me. At first, I thought I was being hacked then I discovered Spotify was accessing my computer’s content for its P2P network. This pissed me off because Spotify has almost no documentation regarding permissions for their P2P access into my computer and it is not configurable. This seems very shady and I cant believe its not a bigger story. Do Spotify users even know the risk they take on by allowing Spotify to freely access their data. Given all that is going on in the world, I definitely do not want to leave my hard drive fully accessible to Spotify or anyone else for that matter. I am canceling my premium subscription ASAP and removing every last bit of Spotify’s P2P software from my computer.


    Reply
  9. Simpleton

    the way to solve the problem if you don’t like the terms is too not enter into contract. this is the most blatantly simple act of freedom I can think of. everything we do is based on contract. freedom is based on contract. if you place stuff where the public can readily access it, i.e. on the internet, it can and will be used by those who you do not have a contract with. I cannot fathom how it would work any other way …


    Reply
    1. @Simpleton

      I think your name says it all because that is dumbest thing I’ve ever read on DMN.


      Reply
    2. Esol Esek

      I not have contract with you, and yet I talk too you…this is not a contract.


      Reply

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