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Radio Rebel: Sell Your Music Online and Keep 100% of the Money…

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Bandcamp is for selling your music. SoundCloud is for streaming your music. Do we need another competing platform thrown into the mix? Radio Rebel thinks so…

Radio Rebel is a “social music marketplace for musicians”. It is scheduled to launch in about a month. On this platform, musicians will be able to sell their music digitally and keep 100% of the money.

Radio Rebel has existed as an online radio station and music website since 2011. They have about 3,500 artists in their network. Now, the site wants to serve as an alternative to platforms like Bandcamp, which takes 10 – 15 percent of sales.

This service will be free to use, with optional premium accounts. Premium accounts will have faster upload and download speeds, no ads, and listener stats. Bands will also be able to purchase ad space on the site.

I asked Radio Rebel’s CEO, Stan Price, how they expect to compete with other established sites. Bandcamp isn’t free, but it has a large user base and provides a wide range of features. Stan said:

“Although we are competing with Bandcamp and other music marketplaces, we do not recommend that musicians stick with just one platform because there are some customers who are loyal to respective sites. However, when bands have control of where their customers buy, we plan on convincing them to direct their customers to Radio Rebel because of the higher profit margin.”

This reimagined platform has been in the planning and development stages for about two years. Radio Rebel is now raising money for this via an Indiegogo campaign. So far they’ve raised $830 with 27 days to go. They hope to raise $50,000, but will get all the money from the campaign even if they don’t meet that goal.

Nina Ulloa covers breaking news, tech, and more. She also runs West Coast Fix. Follow her on Twitter: @nine_u

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Comments (19)
  1. Willis

    Now there’s a real business model. I think all retailers should start selling their products for exactly what they buy them for. Premium accounts? Nobody will pay for this.


    Reply
    1. Crankeh

      I would pay to have stats on my customers if the price is reasonable.


      Reply
  2. Minneapolis Musician

    I think people wanting to start an online business are running low on ideas.


    Reply
  3. The Dude

    As a musician, sign me the hell up! I am tired of iTunes taking a quarter of my sales.


    Reply
  4. Bruce Willie

    Low on ideas indeed, doesn’t look like “Radio Rebel” (isn’t that a disney movie anyway?) is going to be all that competitive.


    Reply
    1. Alan Rickman

      I disagree, sort of. If they do what they say they are doing, I can see a lot of independent musicians signing up and telling all their fans to buy from that store instead of itunes and various others. If you think about it, the more popular you are, the more money you make by through this service because of their rates.

      My only concern is them being able to keep up with growth since their monetization method is quite strange.


      Reply
      1. Tim

        I agree completely. Especially about keeping up with growth. I see a lot of musicians hearing about this and trying it out, but if too many people start to use it things can break and musicians will get upset. Also, server bandwidth and such sounds hard to cover.


        Reply
    2. Alan Rickman

      I disagree, sort of. If they do what they say they are doing, I can see a lot of independent musicians signing up and telling all their fans to buy from that store instead of itunes and various others. If you think about it, the more popular you are, the more money you make by through this service because of their rates.

      My only concern is them being able to keep up with growth since their monetization method is quite strange.


      Reply
  5. Ghost of Tune Hunter

    Music business kicked in nuts. ouch! Discovery moment monetization will help. Implant chip in fans ear and connect to brain and wallet. Fan hears song, artist paid. Only hope for 100 trillion in sales by 2020! Discovery moment monetization is only healing balm for music industry blue balls!


    Reply
    1. Paul Resnikoff

      I think Tune Hunter is still alive, though…


      Reply
  6. steven corn

    HIs quote makes no sense to me. A site like his is only valuable if it becomes a destination site with a certain amount of significant traffic. But ultimately, i think that this will be a “get what you pay for” situation. For artists that don’t want to pay anything for something as significant as their digital download platform, they’ll get what they deserve. if you are serious about selling your music, don’t dive down to the lowest bidder. Invest in your digital platform just like you would invest in your musical instruments. Lots of options out there. Don’t cheap out.


    Reply
    1. Vrat

      Why only use one?


      Reply
  7. hippydog

    Quote “So far they’ve raised $830 with 27 days to go.”

    That statement right there tells you everything you need to know.. Sadly, it aint happening..


    Reply
    1. Nina Ulloa

      from the rest of the article, you would see that it’s happening whether they reach their goal funding or not


      Reply
      1. hippydog

        When I say “aint happening” , I mean it will most likely fail in the long run..
        Sure, they will most likely continue on, even though public interest is almost null, but they would be smarter to pull out now..


        Reply
  8. Muso

    Doomed. Everyone has to pay the bills. Even the poor suckers trying to help you sell your music. Ad financing only works with a lot of traffic. And music sales only works from popular and trusted retailers. That is why iTunes is so popular amongst consumers and artists alike.


    Reply
    1. Crankeh

      It says that they are going to sell premium accounts as well. No mention of funding, but I bet if things get hard they can find someone interested.


      Reply
  9. Muso 2.0

    First sentence in this article (Bandcamp is for selling your music and Soundcloud is for streaming) needs correcting. Should read:
    iTunes is for Selling your music and Spotify is for streaming it.


    Reply
    1. Paul Resnikoff

      These are all super-entrenched players. The question is whether it makes sense to try to dislodge any of them, at least at their own game. For example, would you like to start an on-demand streaming site? Tough question I suppose: with enough firepower anything is possible (look at Beats Music), though prayers are the more common scenario.


      Reply

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