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Disc Makers Gets Back Into the Vinyl Business…

Screen shot 2014-06-12 at 9.10.56 AM

It’s no secret that vinyl continues to grow in popularity. The demand for vinyl has grown so much that some indie labels are speaking out, calling out major labels for monopolizing pressing plants.

Record pressing plants are finally starting to react to the increased demand. United Record Pressing recently expanded their operations by 142,000 square feet.

handPressing Issues: Vinyl Record Quality in Today’s Market

Now, Disc Makers is getting back into the vinyl game.


Disc Makers originally started producing vinyl in 1946. Their manufacturing plant made it easy for independent artists to get records pressed at a reasonable price.

15 years ago Disc Makers’ vinyl business was no longer feasible, and they decided to focus on CDs, DVDs, cassettes, and other formats instead.

Now, after five years of consideration, the company has dusted off and restored their old vinyl pressing equipment. They’ll be using their old equipment once again.

Vinyl can be ordered through the Disc Maker website.

 

Nina Ulloa covers breaking news, tech, and more. She started and runs the music blog West Coast Fix. Follow her on Twitter: @nine_u

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Comments (21)
  1. Ari Herstand

    Fantastic! Hopefully the quality and prices stay competitive. Gotta Groove Records has been doing a great job in this area for awhile, however, with a 3-4 month turnaround time it’s tough to work on that time frame. It seems Discmakers turnaround time (2.5-3 months) is a little better, but that can always get held up with production issues.


    Reply
    1. Anonymous

      You should probably check out United or A to Z. I’ve never dealt with turnaround of less than 9 weeks all in with lacquers and test press. Unless of course you’re talking about pre RSD…


      Reply
  2. Anonymous

    I’ve never really understood why anybody would want to buy ProTools files on vinyl.


    Reply
    1. Nina Ulloa

      some people use analog, y’know


      Reply
      1. MIke lovesvinyl

        Are you for real …..


        Reply
  3. Jason Scheller

    “Fantastic! Hopefully the quality and prices stay competitive. Gotta Groove Records has been doing a great job in this area for awhile, however, with a 3-4 month turnaround time it’s tough to work on that time frame. It seems Discmakers turnaround time (2.5-3 months) is a little better, but that can always get held up with production issues.”

    Maybe you should ask where Discmakers is actually pressing there vinyl because it sure isn’t them “dusting off there old machines” as those were sold years, and the footage in that video is clearly Gotta Groove Records in Ohio.


    Reply
    1. Tony van Veen

      Good discerning eye, Jason.

      We are indeed using Gotta Groove as our replication partner during this launch. It’s important for us to manufacture in the US, and they are the only US plant with a uniformly stellar reputation for quality.

      Our press release said we’re back to offering vinyl to artists, which is true. And Gotta Groove is indeed using the same Hamilton presses – lovingly restored – that were last used to press our records some 15 years ago.

      We’re hopeful that the broad reach Disc Makers has will make it easier for artists to get vinyl made. Which, if market forces prevail, will likely lead to an expansion in capacity in the market.

      Tony van Veen
      CEO, Disc Makers


      Reply
  4. Tony van Veen

    Good discerning eye, Jason.

    We are indeed using Gotta Groove as our replication partner during this launch. It’s important for us to manufacture in the US, and they are the only US plant with a uniformly stellar reputation for quality.

    Our press release said we’re back to offering vinyl to artists, which is true. And Gotta Groove is indeed using the same Hamilton presses – lovingly restored – that were last used to press our records some 15 years ago.

    We’re hopeful that the broad reach Disc Makers has will make it easier for artists to get vinyl made. Which, if market forces prevail, will likely lead to an expansion in capacity in the market.

    Tony van Veen
    CEO, Disc Makers


    Reply
  5. Anonymous

    Tony, you have to admit that press release is purposely misleading. “So now those old Hamilton presses are cranking again. I can smell that unmistakable smell again”. Really? You can smell them running in Ohio? There are a handful of articles today which have all reported that Disc Makers has re opened a factory, so clearly that is the what people understood to be the case from reading your announcement.


    Reply
  6. Tony van Veen

    I prefer “stretching the boundaries of truth, but not purposely misleading.” C’mon, no brownie points for coming clean here? I mean, none at all? Surely more egregious sins have been committed by over eager PR departments.


    Reply
  7. AOR

    Only us plant with a “uniformly stellar reputation” for quality? Is that like 4 out of 5 doctors surveyed? Good to hear that gotta grooves turn time will be even longer once it gets jammed with everyone who had to put out a cd will now have to put out an lp


    Reply
  8. Alex

    “Now, after five years of consideration, the company has dusted off and restored their old vinyl pressing equipment. They’ll be using their old equipment once again.”

    So that statement, printed in bold, is completely untrue? I think it’s great that vinyl is making a comeback but I don’t think such misleading and dishonest marketing is the way to improve the image of the vinyl market. This sort of thing, combined with too much emphasis on overly expensive collectable pressings instead of just the product that matters, is endangering the ressurection of vinyl as a serious music format in my opinion. It leaves a bad taste.


    Reply
  9. anonymous

    This made up story is taking a life of it’s own. Here is a blurb from another article: The company has bought back the machines it sold all those years ago and refurbished its old factory to offer runs of as few as 200 records. Of course, this might mean that another vinyl pressing plant went out of business in order to get Disc Makers up and running again, but that would take the shine off the story a bit. Let’s just assume the presses were rusting in a shed or something. – See more at: http://www.completemusicupdate.com/article/disc-makers-re-opens-vinyl-pressing-plant/. It has always irked me when brokers are deliberately vague about wether or not they are a manufacturer preying on the un informed, disc makers has taken this to a new level. If they believe so strongly in he high quality of Gotta Groove’s product they should not go to such great lengths to concoct this obviously fake story.


    Reply
  10. Versus

    Why much negativity in the comments? This is a positive development for anyone who enjoys vinyl records. It’s another creative option for indie labels and self-releasing artists. This is a good thing.


    Reply
    1. Alex

      The negativity is not about the rise of vinyl, it is about purposely deceptive marketing.


      Reply
  11. Anonymous

    Okay, So Discmakers is just using Gotta Groove. If you go to Gotta Groove’s website and compare prices to DiscMakers, it’s MUCH MUCH MUCH cheaper to just use Gotta Groove’s prices. So, why would anyone pay more $$$ to DiscMakers when they can get the EXACT SAME PRODUCT directly from Gotta Groove for Hundrez of dollars less?


    Reply
    1. Anonymous

      TIL how a brokerage firm works.


      Reply
  12. Rick H

    It looks like the first presses shown in the video are “SMT” machines, not Hamiltons.
    It looks like this is a “very creative” story………


    Reply
  13. Anonymous

    “We are indeed using Gotta Groove as our replication partner during this launch. It’s important for us to manufacture in the US, and they are the only US plant with a uniformly stellar reputation for quality.”

    Really?!?! I’d be willing to bet Gotta Groove was not their only option/choice. They just happen to be the only ones willing to deal with another broker clogging their pipeline. Gotta Groove does nice work, but they are not the only US plant doing good work. In fact, the are probably the most inexperienced since they are relatively new to the game.


    Reply
  14. Jonald Lee Cousins

    Unfortunately, GGR are polishing the groove side of their stampers using toilet paper and paste. It can make the record surface look better, but it attenuates the desired treble response. Most pressing plants refuse to do this, for hi fi output. Disc Makers should go with QRP, Rainbo, or Rite Records.

    – JLC


    Reply
  15. Gee Moore

    3D printers could also play a big part in the future of vinyl.


    Reply

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