Bring. It. On: Google Promises to Fight the US Government

As lawmakers on both sides of the Atlantic debate tough anti-piracy bills, Google is already promising a huge fight – even against the US Government.

At the company’s ‘Big Tent’ event in London on Wednesday, Google executive chairman Eric Schmidt vowed to resist any search-filtering or site-blocking laws, including mandated blocks against sites like the Pirate Bay.

That includes measures currently drafted into either the PROTECT IP (US) or Digital Economy (UK) Acts.  “I would be very, very careful if I were a government about arbitrarily [implementing] simple solutions to complex problems,” Schmidt warned, according to the UK-based Guardian.

In fact, Schmidt seemed to be promising non-cooperation, even if measures were signed by President Obama and codified into law.  “If there is a law for DNSs to do ‘X’ and it’s passed by both houses of Congress and signed by the President of the United States and we disagree with it then we would still fight it,” Schmidt vowed. “If it’s a request the answer is we wouldn’t do it, if it’s a discussion we wouldn’t do it.”

The issue is of paramount importance to the entertainment industry, and Hollywood is ratcheting serious pressure on lawmakers to clean things up.  On the music side, the best torrent and cyberlocker searches start with Google, yet labels have had almost zero success getting search results scrubbed.

Instead, they’ve been forced to operate under the rather onerous and ineffective DMCA, which of course calls for content owners to make one-off takedown requests.  “We play the wack-a-mole problem just as much as the content industry does, and it frustrates us,” Google attorney Kent Walker told members of Congress in April, specifically addressing the incredible number of illicit results for Taylor Swift.  “We are in the best position to rapidly remove content… the content industry is in the best position to let us know what’s authorized and what’s not.  The music industry is a very complicated place.”