FBI: 90% of MegaUpload Users Never Uploaded a Single File

The FBI and Department of Justice are continuing to make their case against MegaUpload, especially as attention shifts towards trial phase.

According to expanded indictment documents sent to Digital Music News Friday morning by DOJ prosecutors, 90 percent of all MegaUpload users were exclusively downloading content – without ever uploading a single file.  “Although the defendants have claimed more than 180 million registered users, the records on their internal computer systems suggest that they had only 66.6 million registered users as of Jan. 19, 2012,” DOJ prosecutors relayed.

“The records also indicate that only 5.86 million of these users ever uploaded a single file to either Megaupload.com or Megavideo.com, demonstrating that more than 90 percent of their registered users only used the defendants’ systems to download.”

 Full Indictment Document

On the flip side, a portion of the remaining 10 percent were exclusively uploading content, which means that the percentage of users actively uploading and downloading files was staggeringly low.  Which, if the FBI stats are accurate, makes MegaUpload look more like a candy store than a healthy locker service.

 Also check out: “What Really Killed MegaUpload? MegaBox, That’s What…

The prosecutors further isolated one heavy uploader to make its case, identifying the suspect only as ‘VV‘:

One repeat alleged infringer referred to as “VV” was identified as a registered user for nearly six years;

VV had been the subject of numerous takedown emails, including 85 notices from one representative, to Megavideo since 2008;

VV received five ‘rewards’ payments from the Mega Conspiracy totaling $3,400 in 2008 and 2009;

VV uploaded approximately 16,950 files to Megavideo.com and Megaupload.com, which generated more than 34 million views;

VV’s uploads included infringing copies of popular copyrighted motion pictures, including Ocean’s Thirteen, Ratatouille, and Evan Almighty;

Internal records reflect no deletions of any of VV’s uploaded files;

Which brings us to the most damning allegation, which is that MegaUpload took repeated steps to keep infringing content on its service, despite repeated takedown demands and false reassurances issued to rights holders.

“The Mega Conspiracy created a computer system architecture which kept its most frequently downloaded files in memory (rather than in storage) on a number of dedicated high-end servers.  Most of the files on these servers were infringing copies of copyrighted works.”

More as it develops.

10 Responses

  1. Come on now

    “The Mega Conspiracy created a computer system architecture which kept its most frequently downloaded files in memory (rather than in storage) on a number of dedicated high-end servers. Most of the files on these servers were infringing copies of copyrighted works.”

    Well, to be fair, noone deletes files from their servers. They just hide them. Stuff is just pulled out of view, usually as not to aggrevate the copyright owners. Last.fm keeps every single mp3 uploaded. Grooveshark keeps everything, too. Just two examples of well known platforms. It is not honest to single out MegaUpload for this tactic, when everyone does exactly the same thing…

  2. PDF

    Hey Paul, it looks like you forgot to publish the expanded indictment documents PDF. It would be nice to read. Give us a download link.

    • paul

      We’ll be uploading it soon – sorry for the delay. It’s actually a good read.

      /paul

  3. AVAX?

    Speaking of piracy and mafia gangs, how is it that avaxhome.ws is still active after all those years?

    • balbers

      Ya, I’ve always wondered about some of those high profile sites which are just massive libraries of obviously infringing material, and how they seemingly aren’t in any of the authorities’ crosshairs. Avax or tehparadox, or hd-bb.org which offers a high-def rip of just about any blu-ray dvd you can imagine for free download.

      How have they avoided being shut down? Those sites pop up on the first page of a Google search even if I’m just trying to find some info on a movie and not necessarily a download.

  4. once a snitch...

    So, it looks like MegaUpload was also snitching people. They e-mailed PayPal with information about other file sharing sites.

    Not surprised to see that behavior from Kim Dotcom, he made his first money working as an informant for German police investigators, giving names of German hackers back in the nineties.