America’s Getting a New National Anthem — And a Rapper’s Gonna Write It

Quavo of Migos: A Modern Day Francis Scott Key

Quavo of Migos: A Modern-Day Francis Scott Key

America’s National Anthem is becoming increasingly controversial.  So why not write a new one?

Not even the singers like ‘The Star Spangled Banner’.  And despite its storied history, America’s National Anthem, ‘The Star Spangled Banner,’ is becoming a major problem at sporting events and public ceremonies.

Now, the protests are intensifying.  Just last week, an entire group of Cleveland Browns players took a knee during the Anthem.  But this time, they were joined by a white player, a first for the league.  All of which suggests that the NFL will be dealing with massive protests at upcoming games.

But what if a new National Anthem was created?

Now, there’s a growing petition to do just that.  And you won’t believe who’s been nominated to lead the effort.

That’s right, the people are nominating Quavo, hailing from the rap group Migos.

This was a spoof at first, playing off Quavo’s constant guest appearances.  And it sounds hilarious, except if you talk to Quavo himself.  Just recently, the rapper expressed serious interest in creating an alternative National Anthem.

Indeed, Quavo hopes to create a song that speaks to every American.  “There’s a lot going on behind the National Anthem,” Quavo told TMZ. “I would love to do it, but I want to do a 2017 national anthem for both people and all races.  Something that’s representing now.  Something representing a modern day National Anthem.”

In other words: why not a song written after slavery, after the Civil War, and after women’s suffrage?

But… Quavo?  A rapper?

Nobody wants a Migos song as their National Anthem (no offense to Migos).  But that probably isn’t what Quavo would set out to create.  Instead, the rapper has expressed interest in consulting with other musicians, and creating something that could survive the test of time.

And let’s face it: rappers are just like popular blues, rock, or jazz musicians of old.  Derided by proper society, only to be lauded by later generations.  So why isn’t a talented rapper capable of creating something that lasts for centuries?

In case of Francis Scott Key — an attorney who repurposed a pre-baked melody — ‘The Star Spangled Banner’ has lasted 203 years (and counting).  But it wasn’t officially declared the National Anthem until 1931.  Prior to that point, the song was widely played during patriotic events and ceremonies.

Currently, the petition has nearly 8,000 supporters.  And one thing is clear: Quavo is taking this invitation very, very seriously.

5 Responses

  1. Paul E. Tick

    “why not a song written after slavery, after the Civil War, and after women’s suffrage?”

    i get it. i really do.

    but if this ACTUALLY entered the public discussion of being a REMOTE possibility, Lee Greenwood satisfies these qualifications, with a song that is practically already a secondary national anthem.

    this is just… ::heavy sigh::

  2. Kev-o

    So just looked at the petition. Many people signing it aren’t even from the US. Total joke.

  3. White_guy

    Interesting idea, Mr. (((Resnikoff.))) There’s just one small hurdle to clear: I’m ready and willing to fight, kill and, if need be, die for my heritage. Are you and your dimwitted golem willing and able to take that challenge simply to (((virtue signal))) to your fellow (((white people?)))

    My shekels are on “no,” you aren’t.

  4. MusicLoverNC

    this is a horrible article, complete clickbait ~ if I see another article from your website this poorly thought out linking to something even more poorly thought out, then I just won’t read any more articles from this website..