Glastonbury, One of the Largest Music Festivals In the World, Bans Plastic Bottles

Glastonbury Music Festival Bans All Plastic Water Bottles

Looking for something to drink?  It’s time to go green, says this popular music festival.  Oh, and probably go thirsty if Glastonbury runs out of steel cups again.

Hot, sweaty festivals require lots of water to survive.  And much of that is consumed from plastic bottles, only to be strewn across the grounds when it’s all over.

Well, not anymore, say festival organizers behind the famous Glastonbury music festival.  At least, not in any plastic containers.

Speaking with the BBC, Emily Eavis, daughter of founder Michael Eavis, said that the popular music festival hopes to implement a ban on plastic bottles in 2019.

“We’re working on banning plastic bottles…  which is an enormous project and it’s taking a lot of time to tackle it with all the different people we work with.”

The plan still remains in its early stages.  Eavis added that it was “a bit early to put any flesh on the bones” about any details.

The move follows several other eco-friendly initiatives organizers have implemented in the past.  Four years ago, the Glastonbury music festival introduced stainless steel bottles, as well as water kiosks.  Thirsty festivalgoers could fill any portable bottle with water for free.

In 2016, as part of its “Love the farm, leave no trace” initiative, organizers offered stainless steel cups designed to be “non-aerodynamic.”  Organizers claimed that this would help minimize injuries from throwing.  The cups were made from 90% recycled material.  Underscoring their popularity, the stainless steel cups sold out in 48 hours.

Held in Pilton, Somerset since 1970, Eavis said that the festival site is having “a fallow year.”  Not holding the event this year would allow the ground to recover.  It also gives time for organizers to focus on implementing the site-wide plastic bottles ban for next year.

Speaking about the festival’s lineup for its monumental event in two years, she added,

“Everyone wants to play the 50th anniversary in two years’ time.”

 


Featured image by mauriceangres (CC0)

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