Kanye West Is Getting Hauled Back into Court by EMI Music Publishing

Kanye West Is Getting Hauled Back into Court by EMI Music Publishing

Photo of Kanye West by Pieter Jannick Dijkstra

EMI Music Publishing is asking a New York federal court judge to reopen their long-standing legal battle with rapper Kanye West because the two parties could not agree on a final settlement.

Earlier this year, West tried to terminate his contract with the company because of a California law that limits personal service contracts to seven years. Over the years, the law has helped many creative people break long-term contracts. Not only have music artists used it, but legendary actress Olivia de Havilland used it as well to break her contract with Warner Bros.

West originally signed with EMI in a 2003 deal that has been extended several times. His deal with them was so stringent that it reportedly forbid him from retiring during its term.

EMI responded to West’s efforts by filing a lawsuit in a New York court, insisting that their contract with him specifically listed New York as its jurisdiction.

In September of this year, it seemed that the two parties had come to a settlement of the case. They even informed the judge presiding over the case about the settlement. But apparently, the two could not quite finalize the settlement.

In the letter that they sent to the court, EMI wrote, “Unfortunately, as of today’s date, the parties have been unable to finalize the terms of a settlement agreement, or to finally resolve related issues on which a settlement agreement would be conditioned. As a result, good cause exists, and EMI hereby applies, to reopen the Action.”

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So far, neither West nor his attorneys have issued a response to EMI’s letter.

This is not the only lawsuit West is currently involved in. He is also facing a copyright infringement suit over a sample that he used in his 2016 song “Ultralight Beam.” Currently, West’s attorneys are reportedly trying to remove certain plaintiffs and statutory damages from the claim.

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