Pearl Jam Explains to a U.S. Congressman Why the ‘BOSS Act’ Doesn’t Make Sense

Pearl Jam Plays MSG, 2020 (photo: Tammy Lo, CC by 2.0)
  • Save

Pearl Jam Plays MSG, 2020 (photo: Tammy Lo, CC by 2.0)
  • Save
Pearl Jam Plays MSG, 2020 (photo: Tammy Lo, CC by 2.0)

Pearl Jam, the famous five-piece rock band, has been a vocal critic of the ticketing industry, often raising concerns about its unfair practices. However, the band is currently opposing the BOSS Act, which aims to regulate the distribution and resale of event tickets. In a letter to New Jersey Representative Frank Pallone Jr., Pearl Jam has cited several unintended consequences of the proposed legislation that could harm genuine fans.

The BOSS Act, which stands for Better Oversight of Secondary Sales and Accountability in Concert Ticketing Act, is currently being retooled and drafted by Pallone Jr. Pearl Jam has acknowledged the challenges faced by fans who wish to see their favorite artists perform live. But they have also pointed out that the legislation’s unintended consequences far outweigh its positives.

According to Pearl Jam, the BOSS Act primarily benefits professional ticket resellers and puts genuine fans at a disadvantage. The band has also expressed concerns about the proposed ban on non-transferable ticketing, which they believe would assist scalpers and harm genuine fans.

Last week, Pearl Jam made headlines for partnering with Ticketmaster to prevent ticket reselling from becoming an issue on their upcoming Gigaton Tour. The band believes that it’s up to artists to limit scalping and ticket fraud. According to the band, ticket reselling is a complex issue that requires a multi-pronged approach, and they are committed to working with Ticketmaster to combat it.

The letter also states that requiring primary ticket sellers to reveal the total number of available tickets would further encourage and aid scalpers. Pearl Jam believes that this provision could lead to a situation where scalpers buy up all the tickets as soon as they go on sale, leaving genuine fans with no option but to buy from resellers at inflated prices.

However, the letter also lists several BOSS Act elements that Pearl Jam finds favorable. These include the provisions that address the transparency of ticket websites and transaction fees, as well as the suggested limits on non-human (bot) ticket reservations.

Pearl Jam’s opposition to the BOSS Act is not surprising given the band’s history with Ticketmaster. In the 1990s, Pearl Jam was involved in a contentious dispute with the ticketing giant, going as far as boycotting the company’s venues over what was perceived as monopolistic business practices. However, changes to Ticketmaster’s policies helped to bring about a more positive relationship, and the company is now the sole distributor of tickets for Pearl Jam’s upcoming Gigaton Tour, which will begin on March 18th.

Pearl Jam’s upcoming album, also titled Gigaton, is slated to release on March 27th. The album is the band’s first in seven years, and fans are eagerly anticipating its release. The band’s opposition to the BOSS Act has sparked a debate among fans and industry insiders, with some supporting the legislation and others questioning its effectiveness.

In conclusion, Pearl Jam’s opposition to the BOSS Act is rooted in their concern for genuine fans who are often at the mercy of scalpers and resellers. While the band supports measures to increase transparency and accountability in the ticketing industry, they believe that the proposed legislation could have unintended consequences that would harm genuine fans. The debate over the BOSS Act is likely to continue, with stakeholders on both sides presenting their arguments and concerns.