ThreeDee Music Launches New Spatial Audio Studio in London

ThreeDee Music London
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ThreeDee Music London
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Photo Credit: ThreeDee Music

ThreeDee Music has announced the opening its new recording studio in the heart of East London.

The complex consists of several studio units equipped with vintage analogue equipment, a large live room with a special selection of rare instruments, and a state-of-the-art mastering suite with 9.1.4. Dolby Atmos and dedicated rooms for writing and composing music.

“In our studio complex in London, which is a symbiosis of traditional music production and a new world of music in 3D, we are able to offer clients the perfect place to write, record, mix, and master—while continuing to deliver the holistic approach we are known for in the industry,” Matthias Stalter told Digital Music News about the new space.

The former Abbey Road Studios-based music producer and CEO founded ThreeDee Music in 2021 with headquarters in London and Munich.

Stalter worked as one of only two in-house producers at the legendary Abbey Road Studios in London, where he had his own production suite. ThreeDee Music has become a pioneer in spatial audio productions with their certified studios in London and Munich—as well as through their holistic approach to mixing and recording for immersive audio formats.

Under his guidance, ThreeDee Music became the market leader in 3D music production for central European markets in 2023. Part of what has guided the success of the studio is the simplified communications provided through app-based means, granting prioprietary approval and control solutions. These factors save customers precious time and guarantee a fast turn-around in daily business.

ThreeDee Music previously had its home at Strongroom Studios in London before moving to the much larger location. Stalter says the move has to do with ThreeDee Music’s international expansion of the company and the need to serve high production capacities in 2024. Part of that comes from Apple’s willingness to pay higher royalties on spatial audio mixes—a controversial move that has yet to play out.