Yesterday’s Solar Eclipse Was Great News For Pink Floyd As Listeners Sync “Eclipse” Up the Charts

Pink Floyd eclipse charts thanks to sync
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Pink Floyd eclipse charts thanks to sync
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Photo Credit: Karl Magnuson

Yesterday’s solar eclipse sent a swath of the world outside (with eye protection!) to behold the last solar eclipse in America until 2044. Classic rock band Pink Floyd saw immediate benefits as fans sought to ‘sync’ “Eclipse” with the four and a half minutes of totality.

The moon completely covered the sun in 15 states, spanning Texas to Maine. Everyone else outside the path of totality got partial coverage—but classic rock fans everywhere helped contribute to sending Pink Floyd’s “Eclipse” to the top of the charts to celebrate the occasion.

The track appeared inside the Top 10 on the U.S. iTunes chart at #8 according to Forbes—and 61.3% of Americans have iPhones. The decades-old hit sits alongside newer tracks like Beyoncé’s “Texas Hold ‘Em” (#9). The song “Eclipse” is the final track on Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon album and it regularly charts as pop interest piques.

The song wasn’t a hit when it originally released in 1973 as it wasn’t spun off as a single. However, interest in celestial events like solar and lunar eclipses has helped the track make a resurgence—especially due to social media. The song made it onto the Rock Digital Song Sales ranking in 2017 when the last solar eclipse painted its way across America, peaking at #24 on the list of best-selling rock songs.

Several guides posted online helped people figure out how to sync the song with their view of the eclipse. And of course, many of them added a “listen to the entire album to experience the best effect.”

But for the millions of Americans who were inside the path of totality, starting the album at 41 minutes and 53 seconds before the start of the total eclipse got the effect of ending the viewing experience with the line—”And everything under the sun is in tune, but the sun is eclipsed by the moon.”