Drake Used AI to Re-Create Tupac’s Voice In His Kendrick Lamar Diss Track — Now Tupac’s Family Is Responding

Tupac's family responds to AI diss track created by Drake
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Tupac's family responds to AI diss track created by Drake
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Photo Credit: Rodrigo Ulloa

Drake borrowed Tupac’s voice to hype up Kendrick Lamar to respond to his diss track dropped line dubbed, “Taylor Made.” Now Tupac’s brother has responded.

It’s worth noting that a release like this would be illegal under Tennessee’s ELVIS Act, which bans the use of AI-generated voices without express permission. A separate provision of that act, if it becomes a model for a national law, would hold AI platforms liable and open to lawsuit against any person who “makes available an algorithm, software, tool, or technology, service, or device” that creates unauthorized recording’s of a person’s voice.

TMZ caught up with Mopreme Shakur, Tupac’s brother to ask his thoughts about Drake channeling his brother’s voice for modern beef. Mopreme told the outlet he was displeased with Drake’s insertion of his late brother into his beef. Mopreme says he views it as ‘weaponizing’ his brother’s voice in a rap war, likening the move to utilizing a tank or nuclear bomb in a one-on-one exchange.

Both Mopreme and Suge Knight have expressed the sentiment that Tupac’s voice and image should not be used as a pawn in war. Despite the comments, Mopreme admitted he was a fan of both Drake and Kendrick Lamar and hopes to see both sides dropping tracks and competing via records rather than in the streets.

Last year, Duane ‘Keefe D’ Davis was arrested and charged with the 1996 murder of Tupac Shakur. He appeared in court today for a status update on the case, with his attorney Carl Arnold saying his accounts of the killing are ‘fiction’ and that prosecutors lack evidence to obtain a murder conviction.

“He himself is giving different stories,” Arnold told reporters who were gathered outside of a courtroom. “We haven’t seen more than just his word,” Arnold continued, discussing Davis’s police and media interviews.

Prosecutors allege Davis incriminated himself in Shakur’s killing after releasing a tell-all memoir in 2019 about leading a street gang in Compton, California. Arnold argues that Davis wanted to make money with the memoir, so he embellished or outright lied in parts of the story.