Spotify Says Apple Is Refusing to Approve Its EU Updates — “Apple Continues to Break European Law”

Spotify Apple EU
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Spotify Apple EU
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Photo Credit: Pongracz Noemi

Spotify submitted a new version of its app to Apple that includes basic pricing information for European users. Apple has rejected that update—prompting Spotify to complain to the European Commission.

One provision Apple has included is a new ‘Music Streaming Services Entitlement,’ rule, which requires up to 27% commission fees on any purchases initiated through the app—even if they don’t use Apple’s in-app purchase system. That fee is essentially the 30% Apple would normally receive, minus 3% processing fees for a payment processor.

“Despite Apple’s attempts to punish developers with new fees, we remain committed to giving consumers real choice in our app at no increased cost,” Spotify said in a public-facing statement about the issue on X/Twitter. “That’s why we have submitted a new update to Apple. It features basic pricing and website information—the bare minimum outlined under the European Commission’s ruling in its music streaming case.”

“By charging developers for communicating with consumers through links in-app, Apple continues to break European law,” adds Dustee Jenkins, Spotify’s Chief Public Affairs Officer. “It’s past time for the Commission to enforce its decision so that consumers can see real, positive results.”

Apple itself notes that Spotify’s failure to accept this new ‘Music Streaming Services Entitlement (EEA)’ is at hand for the app’s recent rejection. “We will approve version 8.9.33 after you accept the terms of the EEA and resubmit it for review,” the email to Spotify with the rejection reads.

So now the ball is in the European Commission’s court to assess whether or not Apple has fully complied with its decision. The commission also notes that it will assess Apple’s App Store changes in relation to the Digital Markets Act. “In general, if the Commission suspects that there is non-compliance with an adopted decision, it will send the undertaking concerned a Statement of Objections explaining why it believes there is non-compliance,” a European Commission spokesperson told TechCrunch.