Jobs Reactions Continue; Warner Chief Backs Protection

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On Thursday, Warner Music chairman Edgar Bronfman, Jr. issued a pro-DRM message, largely a response to recent comments by Apple chief Steve Jobs. During an earnings call, Bronfman made it clear that they advocate the continued use of DRM in the protection of their and their artists’ intellectual property. He stated that the notion that music does not deserve the same protections as software, television, film, video games, or other intellectual property is completely without logic or merit.

The label head promised that they will not abandon DRM, nor will they disadvantage services that are successfully implementing DRM for both content and consumers. Bronfman’s comments echo a philosophy expressed by other executives, namely that a well-crafted, universal protection system delivers a better alternative to open formats. That has led to industry calls for Apple to license its FairPlay protection system, though Jobs has steadfastly refused that suggestion.

The reaction follows a similar message from label group RIAA, which recently rifled back against the Jobs call for open formats. Both counterarguments focused on interoperability, regarded as the higher goal. “By far the larger issue for consumers in the music industry is interoperability,” Bronfman said. “As a content company, we, of course, want consumers to seamlessly access our music and to use the music they have purchased on any platform and with any service, physical or digital. The issue is obscured by asserting that DRM and interoperability is the same thing. They are not.”

It is worth noting that Bronfman’s comments come at a time when the music industry is undergoing a significant shift. With the rise of streaming services, the industry is seeing a decline in physical sales and an increase in digital sales. This shift has led to a debate over the role of DRM in the industry. Some argue that DRM hinders innovation and prevents consumers from fully enjoying their purchased music, while others argue that it is necessary to protect the intellectual property of artists and labels.

Bronfman’s stance on the issue is clear: he believes that DRM is necessary to protect the intellectual property of the music industry and its artists. He argues that music deserves the same protections as other forms of intellectual property and that a well-crafted, universal protection system delivers a better alternative to open formats.

However, there are those who disagree with Bronfman’s stance. They argue that DRM hinders innovation and prevents consumers from fully enjoying their purchased music. They point to the fact that DRM has not stopped piracy and that it has only served to inconvenience legitimate consumers. In addition, they argue that DRM limits interoperability and prevents consumers from using their purchased music on any platform or service.

Despite the ongoing debate, it is clear that the music industry is undergoing a significant shift. With the rise of streaming services, the industry is seeing a decline in physical sales and an increase in digital sales. As such, the role of DRM in the industry is being hotly debated. While some argue that DRM is necessary to protect the intellectual property of the music industry and its artists, others argue that it hinders innovation and prevents consumers from fully enjoying their purchased music. Regardless of where one stands on the issue, it is clear that the music industry will continue to evolve and adapt to the changing landscape.