ASCAP Targets “Copy Left / Free Culture” Enemy

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The music industry has always been a battleground for artists’ rights and the rights of their works. However, the advent of the digital age has brought new challenges to traditional copyright laws. In light of this, the performance rights organization (PRO) ASCAP is now considering ways to counter the influence of non-traditional copyright thinkers.

According to correspondence shared Thursday with Digital Music News, ASCAP is coordinating a luncheon on February 3rd to discuss several issues, including “licensing and rate proceedings in the digital area,” “the new Congress,” and “working together to counter the growing prevalence of the ‘copy left/free culture’ pontificators in the public discourse about creators’ rights.”

The organization is seemingly referring to Lawrence Lessig, a prominent legal scholar and activist who advocates for a “some rights reserved” structure rather than the traditional copyright approach. Lessig is the founder of the “free culture movement,” which is closely aligned with the ideas of Creative Commons, another organization founded by Lessig.

Lessig’s ideas have gained traction in recent years, particularly in the digital realm, where copyright laws have struggled to keep up with rapid technological advancements. His approach has been criticized by some in the music industry who believe that it undermines artists’ rights and devalues their work.

The leaked correspondence suggests that ASCAP is concerned about the influence that Lessig and other non-traditional copyright thinkers are having on the public discourse about creators’ rights. The organization appears to be seeking ways to counter this influence and promote a more traditional copyright approach.

The Los Angeles luncheon will be hosted by ASCAP president and chairwoman Marilyn Bergman, as well as chief executive John LoFrumento. The event is likely to attract a range of industry insiders, including musicians, music publishers, and copyright lawyers.

While the luncheon may be seen as an attempt to push back against the free culture movement, it is also an opportunity for industry insiders to discuss some of the key issues facing the music industry in the digital age. Licensing and rate proceedings in the digital area are particularly important, as the industry seeks to find a way to monetize music in an age where streaming services dominate.

The new Congress is also likely to be a hot topic of discussion, as the music industry seeks to influence lawmakers to support their views on copyright law. The growing prevalence of streaming services and the rise of independent artists have led to a more complex landscape for copyright law, and the industry is keen to ensure that their interests are protected.

The luncheon is an important event for the music industry, and its outcomes are likely to be watched closely by industry insiders and copyright experts alike. As the industry grapples with the challenges of the digital age, it is important that all voices are heard and that a fair and equitable approach is taken to copyright law.

In conclusion, the ASCAP luncheon is an opportunity for industry insiders to discuss some of the key issues facing the music industry in the digital age. While the organization appears to be seeking ways to counter the influence of non-traditional copyright thinkers, the event is also an opportunity for all voices to be heard and for a fair and equitable approach to be taken to copyright law. The outcomes of the luncheon are likely to be watched closely by industry insiders and copyright experts alike.