ISP Disconnection Law On Hold In New Zealand

In a recent development, the New Zealand government has decided to put a hold on a law that would have forced Internet Service Providers (ISPs) in the country to disconnect subscribers who were found guilty of infringing copyright laws. Prime Minister John Key has put the law on hold pending further review of the initiative. This move has been welcomed by various organizations, including the New Zealand Computer Society, which is part of a consortium that has been rallying against the measure.

The law, which is part of the Copyright (New Technologies) Amendment Act, has been dubbed the “Guilty Upon Accusation” law by its opponents. The disconnection clause, known as Section 92a, has been the subject of much debate and controversy since it was first proposed. The law would have allowed copyright holders to accuse an individual of copyright infringement, without any evidence, and the individual would have been guilty until proven innocent.

The proposed law has been met with fierce opposition from various quarters, including the Creative Freedom Foundation, which has been leading the charge against the measure. The organization has been using various means to raise awareness about the issue, including a recent “blackout” of its blog to draw attention to the proposed law.

The Telecommunications Carriers’ Forum (TCF), which represents the major ISPs in New Zealand, has also opposed the plan. The TCF has argued that the law would place an unfair burden on ISPs, who would be expected to police their networks and disconnect subscribers who were accused of infringing copyright laws, without any evidence.

The proposed law has been the subject of much debate and controversy since it was first proposed. Supporters of the law argue that it is necessary to protect copyright holders’ rights, and that it will help to curb piracy and illegal file-sharing. Opponents, however, argue that the law is too harsh and that it violates the principle of innocent until proven guilty.

The decision to put the law on hold has been welcomed by many in the online community, who have been campaigning against the measure. Paul Matthews, the head of the New Zealand Computer Society, has congratulated the government for listening to the concerns of the online community. He has also called for a more balanced approach to copyright law, which takes into account the interests of both copyright holders and users.

The decision to put the law on hold has also been seen as a victory for the online community, which has been mobilizing against the measure. The blackout campaign organized by the Creative Freedom Foundation was just one of the many ways in which the online community has been raising awareness about the issue. The campaign was successful in drawing attention to the proposed law and in getting people to sign a petition against it.

The decision to put the law on hold is a positive step, but it is not the end of the road. The proposed law is still on the books, and it could still be implemented in the future. The government has said that it will review the measure and make a decision about its future. This means that the online community will need to remain vigilant and continue to campaign against the measure.

In conclusion, the decision to put the law on hold is a positive step, and it is a victory for the online community. The proposed law has been the subject of much debate and controversy, and it has been met with fierce opposition from various quarters. The decision to put the law on hold is a recognition of the concerns raised by the online community, and it is a sign that the government is listening to its citizens. However, the battle is not over, and the online community will need to remain vigilant and continue to campaign against the measure.

Report by analyst Alexandra Osorio.