Warner Music Group & Hello There Games Team Up for New Rhythm Game ‘Invector: Rhythm Galaxy’

Warner Music Hello There Invector
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Warner Music Hello There Invector
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Photo Credit: WMG

Warner Music Group is joining forces with Swedish game studio Hello There Games for a new rhythm game.

‘Invector: Rhythm Galaxy’ is a narrative-driven rhythm game set to the soundtrack of 40-hit songs across a variety of music genres. Players will navigate breathtaking, celestial landscapes while mastering the beat of chart-topping hits from artists like Charlie Puth, PinkPantheress, Duran Duran, and many more. 

The game follows on the heels of the successful AVICII Invector, co-developed by Hello There Games and Avicii himself. The newest game will leverage WMG’s roster of global artists to build a rhythm game that appeals to a wide variety of tastes. Players will fly through eight vibrant cosmic landscapes, either solo or with 2-player or 4-player local multiplayer. 

This marks WMG’s first foray into games publishing and illustrates the company’s commitment to delivering thrilling, interactive experiences.

“This venture into gaming showcases our commitment to reimagining the boundaries of music and how it is defined by artists and fans alike within our evolving ecosystem,” adds Oana Ruxandra, Chief Digital Officer and EVP, Business Development, WMG. “Invector: Rhythm Galaxy intertwines the power of music with the interaction of gaming to build active, immersive experiences for fans and new revenue streams for WMG’s artists.”

“At Hello There Games, our unwavering passion for music and gaming fuels our drive,” adds Oskar Eklund, CEO, and Founder at Hello There Games. “Many of our team members are talented musicians themselves. We are so excited to bring this game to the next level with Warner Music Group and their amazing artists. We can’t wait for everyone to experience the magic.”

Invector: Rhythm Galaxy will release on July 14 for PC, with console release dates coming later. As an avid gamer myself, it’s hard not to mention how much the game looks like Audiosurf—a game from 2008 that turns .mp3s into race tracks.