YouTube Executive Tells the Music Industry to Stop Whining, Start Innovating

YouTube Sad Face

YouTube paid the music industry $1 billion in the last year alone, according to comments from an executive today.  So why all the whining?

Almost overnight, YouTube the biggest enemy of the music industry.  And this debate is getting uglier by the second.  This year, the company has been accused of ripping off artists, stealing their videos, and barely paying its fair share.  Even the biggest manager in the music business, Irving Azoff, has come out swinging against YouTube.

At one point, Azoff even threatened remove his entire roster — of more than 20,000 tracks — from YouTube.  A five-time Grammy Award winner even called the site ‘piracy pushers‘ and ‘total scumbags’.  Even the entire European Union has demanded that YouTube pay musicians more money.

So where’s the disconnect?  Now, YouTube is fighting back, and telling the music industry to stop complaining.  Here’s a blog post from YouTube executive Robert Kyncl, who pointed to $1 billion in advertising royalties in the past year alone.

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“A billion reasons to celebrate music on YouTube”

Tuesday, December 6, 2016

Last year was a bright one for music.  After several tough years of declining revenues, the industry started growing again, spurred in large part by the growth of music streaming subscriptions.  This year, the industry has even more reasons to be optimistic.  Even as music subscriptions have been growing faster than any other subscription type, advertising is another powerful driver of revenue.

In fact, in the last 12 months, YouTube has paid out over $1 billion to the music industry from advertising alone, demonstrating that multiple experiences and models are succeeding alongside each other.

And this is just the beginning. As more advertising dollars shift from TV, radio and print to online services, the music industry will generate even more revenue from ads. In the future, the music business has an opportunity to look a lot like television, where subscriptions and advertising contribute roughly equal amounts of revenue, bolstered by digital and physical sales. To achieve this, there is a lot of work that must be done by YouTube and the industry as a whole, but we are excited to see the momentum.

Also Read:  Warner Music Nashville Joins the Party on Standardized, Complete Music Credits

At a time when there’s never been more competition for attention, fans can’t get enough good music. It is clear that this creative industry has two strong engines of growth, subscriptions and advertising.  And we are honored to be a part of it.

Robert Kyncl, Chief Business Officer, recently watched “The Hamilton Mixtape Performance Live Stream.”

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18 Responses

  1. Avatar
    Buckley

    Great, now all YouTube needs to do is stand up to the music industry when it comes to their takedowns of music critics’ videos, get actual customer service, and fix about 20 other problems, and maybe they’ll be seen in a positive light again!

    Reply
    • Avatar
      Anonymous

      Let’s not forget Glass. And Google+. And YouTube Music Key.

      The list goes on and on.

      Reply
  2. Avatar
    Remi Swierczek

    Robert, is just nice and polite corporate PUPET on board of MUSIC Auschwitz!

    YouTube with Google are the SINGLE ROADBLOCK to $100B music industry by 2020,
    $200B music business by 2025 and $300B music world by 2030.

    Let’s find Larry Page, THE MOONSHOT SEEKER and tell him hoe to double his Google by 2020 on music!

    Reply
    • Avatar
      Remi Swierczek

      Screw you Larry! You are actually very little guy!

      Be a FAIR human, if anything to your own GREED!

      Reply
    • Avatar
      Remi Swierczek

      Stop inpersonating me sir. You know I am the real Remi. I don’t like your attitude, boy.

      Reply
      • Avatar
        Remi Swierczek

        1 trillion music industry is just around the corner. Music broadcasting drones flying 24/7 – LIMITLESS revenue!!

        Wake up Larry!

        Reply
  3. Avatar
    Anonymous

    “Robert Kyncl, who pointed to $1 billion in advertising royalties in the past year alone”

    Google-speak for $100m.

    Reply
    • Avatar
      Anonymous

      Fuck his BILLION 1999 music business with no growth, after inflation adjustment would be TODAY $60 billions!

      Let’s smoke Sir Lucian and his UMG team to oblivion!

      Let’s convert SonyMusic to assisted living facility and enlighten LARRY PAGE to double or triple his Google on $200 or $300 billion dollar music industry.

      Reply
  4. Avatar
    Brandy

    Wow. Are these people only realizing now that the mainstream music industry is run by greedy despots and stingy megalomaniacs?
    Good luck trying to stop illegal downloading, wherever there’s a will to loot and plunder, there’s a pirate… although, knowing how slimy and gluttonous these people are, don’t really care. How much money is enough? Disgusting and disgraceful.

    Reply
  5. Avatar
    Versus

    Not good enough, YouTube. Do something real about all the illicit music content, which pays nothing to the musicians, and then maybe, just maybe, you can claim with some justification that you care about music and musicians.

    Reply
  6. Avatar
    jr

    Again the point is missed..how much money did youtube make from the music content.? Until folks start asking the right questions numbers are without meaning. Except for 42, that has meaning.

    Reply
  7. Avatar
    Popeye

    Where exactly does he say “stop whining, start innovating..”? Your reporting is shit, and so is YouTube.

    Reply
  8. Avatar
    Adolph

    Paul “Goebbels” Resnikoff
    December 7, 2016

    “Subtext is everything.”

    And a lie repeated often enough…

    Thank God no one takes this site seriously.

    Reply
  9. Avatar
    bunch of relics.

    the only only innovation the music industry knows how to do is in lobbying.

    remember when they said mixtapes were killing music and everyone who used them should go to jail?

    Reply

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