Bow Wow Could Face Felony Charges for ‘Issuing Threats’ Against Melania Trump

Picture of Melania Trump During Donald Trump's Presidential Campaign. Rapper Bow Wow Could Face Felony Charges for Issuing Threats Against the First Lady.

Photo: Marc Nozell (CC by 2.0)

Bow Wow (real name Shad Moss) may soon face criminal repercussions for ‘issuing threats’ against Melania Trump, according to legal experts.

What started as beef between Snoop Dogg and Donald Trump may soon result in felony charges for multiple rappers.  That includes Bow Wow (real name Shad Moss), who risks being slapped with serious felony charges for issuing threats of his own, according to attorneys watching this case.

This all started on Monday when Snoop Dogg released ‘Lavender,’ which contains a graphic, mock assassination of President Trump.  That drew quick warnings from Marco Rubio and Donald Trump’s attorney, before Trump himself demanded prison time for the rapper.

Donald Trump Demands Snoop Dogg’s Arrest Over Assassination Threats

Whether Secret Service agents are currently interrogating Snoop Dogg remains unknown, with the rapper keeping quiet.  But federal investigations would quickly spread to include Bow Wow, based on the perceived seriousness of the threats issued.

Specifically, Bow Wow blasted this threat against Melania Trump following Trump’s demand for Snoop Dogg’s arrest.

“Ayo @realDonaldTrump shut your punk ass up talking shit about my uncle @SnoopDogg before we pimp your wife and make her work for us.”

That introduces a number of intentional threats, including kidnapping and forced sexual slavery.  Specifically, ‘pimping’ would introduce charges for ‘inflicting bodily harm’ against a First Lady.  All of which violates statutes contained within ‘U.S.C. § 879: US Code Section 879: Threats against former Presidents and certain other persons’.

The law specifically calls for felony charges against

“Anyone that knowingly and willfully threatens to kill, kidnap, or inflict bodily harm upon:

(1) a former President or a member of the immediate family of a former President;

(2) a member of the immediate family of the President, the President-elect, the Vice President, or the Vice President-elect;

(3) a major candidate for the office of President or Vice President.  Or a member of the immediate family of such candidate; or

(4) a person protected by the Secret Service under section 3056(a)(6).

Separately, the US Department of Justice has addressed the issue of intent, specifically as it relates to ‘political hyperbole’ and ‘jest’.  And it turns out that actual intent doesn’t quite matter.  “Proof that threatening words were uttered in a context such that a reasonable person would interpret them as mere political hyperbole, idle talk, or jest indicates that the words do not constitute a threat within the scope of the statute,” the Justice Department notes.

“However, it is the view of the Department that an actual intent to carry out a threat is not a requisite to violation of the statute.”

More as this situation develops.

 

10 Responses

  1. Dre

    Terrible article. Clearly states at the bottom that “jest” and “hyperbole” is not considered a serious threat. You tried to relate a law to this situation that wont be seen through. Bow Wow wont be targeted by the law. Waste of read.. this is why intelligent people dont give a crap about these weak articles while unintelligent people dont even read them. But hey.. you got your click and seconds on the website from me? Right? Good luck with this bs..

    • TRUMPWONULOST

      Comprehension ~ Your ebonics mind cant quite grasp words have meanings ,and your ass hole better be ready to pay for the words lil cunts speak.

    • Bob

      Pure BS and click bait again. That’s all DMN seems to be good for these days.

      It’s amusing reading Resnikoff’s amateurish attempts to interpret federal statutes. Is he simply being disingenuous or does he actually believe the tripe he writes? And which is more embarrassing?

    • Whitey

      This little coin doggy probably just signed his own death warant. Owell one less on the street.

    • Rip Rap Rippity Do

      You’re here genius called Dre. Wow, the Smith of the guetto.

      I’m not a fan of click bait but this is a current article and you’re a flaming idiot. Little Bow Loser Wow is clearly someone who has done literally nothing with his life, other than smoking blunts, making bad rap music, and apparently, he knows something about ‘pimping’ prostitutes, probably disadvantaged women in his community. Sounds like a real upstanding citizen. Clowns like you aren’t doing your brethren any favors. Blow Wow just shined a spotlight onto the cockroaches of his part of the rap game. Snoop is different. He has talent, and the video is incredible, but that’s the top. There’s many levels below filled with the criminal scum everyone has always complained about in rap.

      I wouldn’t be so sure Bow Wow won’t be charged, but we’ll see. Therefore, your stupid comment is inaccurate, but you keep telling yourself how wonderful you are. Pride is not a sin, right?

  2. Wooly

    Not gonna happen. No threats were issued. Reading comprehension is important.

    • Rip Rap Rippity Do

      Kidnapping is a threat, moron. I know it’s a popular form of employment for some people, and they forget it’s a crime, but it’s still a crime.

  3. John

    Need to lock Snoop and Bow Wow up totally disrespected our nation!

  4. Paul Resnikoff

    I’d urge everyone to see how this pans out. The Trump Administration may decide that threats are escalating to an uncomfortable degree. Even the White House ‘fortress’ is getting infiltrated.

    I’m all for free speech. But just throwing out the distinct possibility of some crackdown here. This is not a president that takes slights lightly.

    • loup

      Ted Nugent was “interviewed” by the Secret Service in 2012 after (as Natalie Jennings reported in the Washington Post:

      “The controversy erupted after the self-styled “Motor City Madman” made an impassioned plea for support for Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney during the National Rifle Association meeting in St. Louis last weekend. “We need to ride into that battlefield and chop their heads off in November,” Nugent said of the Obama administration.

      He also included a cryptic pronouncement: “If Barack Obama becomes the next president in November, again, I will either be dead or in jail by this time next year.”

      Outraged Democrats circulated the remarks and suggested they were threatening. Secret Service spokesman George Ogilvie confirmed that the agency was looking into the matter but declined to give details. “We are aware of the incident and we are taking appropriate follow-up,” Ogilvie said.”

      Ms. Jennings and the Washington Post jumped from reporting to editorializing after Ted Nugent’s remarks:

      “So, we have a guy who says incendiary things. A guy whose support was actively sought by the candidate. A guy whose support was championed by said candidate’s son. But now that it is called on to disavow and condemn Nugent’s poisonous words, all the outrage that Team Romney fired upon Rosen seems to be depleted.

      “Divisive language is offensive no matter what side of the political aisle it comes from,” said Romney spokesperson Andrea Saul. “Mitt Romney believes everyone needs to be civil.”

      This doesn’t cut it, folks. Nugent accused the president of the United States, the vice president, the attorney general and four justices of the Supreme Court of not liking or believing in the Constitution. And he did so in vivid, if not vile, language.”

      But the Washington Post doesn’t have a word to say about a rapper threatening to kidnap, rape and subject to sexual slavery the First Lady of the United States.